Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Stop abusing insecticides in rice, experts urge

Date:
January 5, 2012
Source:
International Rice Research Institute
Summary:
To prevent devastating insect pest outbreaks in rice that cause millions of dollars of damage, the International Rice Research Institute has called for a ban on certain insecticides in rice production as part of its new Action plan to reduce planthopper damage to rice crops in Asia.

To prevent devastating insect pest outbreaks in rice that cause millions of dollars of damage, the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) has called for a ban on certain insecticides in rice production as part of its new Action plan to reduce planthopper damage to rice crops in Asia.

Related Articles


At a conference in Hanoi, Vietnam, IRRI brought together leaders in the rice industry to advance towards a "greener game plan" to manage brown planthoppers, which, without exaggeration, are one of a rice farmer's worst fears.

"We need to seriously rethink our current pest management strategies so we don't just cope with current outbreaks, but prevent and manage them effectively in the long run," says Dr. Bas Bouman, head of the Crop and Environmental Sciences Division at IRRI and leader of the Global Rice Science Partnership (GRiSP) program on sustainable production systems.

"At the conference we engaged policymakers, agricultural scientists, researchers, extension workers, and the private sector that have a direct stake in Vietnam's agricultural industry and can make a positive contribution to a long-term planthopper management strategy," said Dr. Bouman.

Considered a major scourge in rice-producing countries, planthoppers in large numbers cause considerable damage by sucking sap from rice plants, causing them to wilt and die. They also transmit three viral diseases that stunt rice plants and prevent grain formation.

"Planthopper outbreaks occur when there is a breakdown in 'ecological resilience' of a rice farm," explains Dr. K.L. Heong, an insect ecologist at IRRI.

"Beneficial predators such as spiders and bugs that feed on planthoppers are part of a natural system of 'checks and balances' that keeps planthopper populations below outbreak levels," he added. "When this natural balance is disrupted, however, planthopper outbreaks occur."

Many beneficial insects that prey on planthoppers are killed inadvertently when insecticides are misused or are used indiscriminately. Also, growing three rice crops a year or using the same varieties over a large area and for a long period can lead to pest outbreaks due to the adaptation and buildup of pest populations.

The Action plan recommends two major principles -- first to enhance biodiversity and second to regulate the marketing and use of insecticides, including the banning of certain outbreak-causing insecticides in rice.

With IRRI's support, just three months ago, Thailand banned the use of two insecticides in rice -- abamectin and cypermethrin -- because they are known to be major causes of planthopper outbreaks.

Also, in March this year, the Vietnamese province of An Giang started adopting ecological engineering practices such as growing flowers in nearby paddies to nurture planthopper predators.

"It's a first step and there's a lot more to go, but openness to change is nothing new to Vietnam," cited Dr. Heong.

The country, having seen dramatic changes in its rice production over the last 26 years, went from being a struggling rice importer to becoming a strong rice exporter now by adopting a country-wide reform policy called "Doi Moi" in the late 1980s. Doi Moi was the underlying force behind Vietnam's rice success today, and it literally means "change and newness."

"With the two leading rice-exporting countries, Thailand and Vietnam, showing such leadership in better pest management, we remain optimistic that, in the future, planthopper outbreaks will lessen in their frequency and severity," Dr. Bouman concluded.

The international conference Threats of Insecticide Misuse in Rice Ecosystems -- Exploring Options for Mitigation, was held on 16 December 2011 in Hanoi, Vietnam.

Action plan.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by International Rice Research Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

International Rice Research Institute. "Stop abusing insecticides in rice, experts urge." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 January 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120105112156.htm>.
International Rice Research Institute. (2012, January 5). Stop abusing insecticides in rice, experts urge. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120105112156.htm
International Rice Research Institute. "Stop abusing insecticides in rice, experts urge." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120105112156.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Friday, October 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Black Bear Cub Goes Sunday Shopping

Black Bear Cub Goes Sunday Shopping

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Oct. 23, 2014) Price check on honey? Bear cub startles Oregon drugstore shoppers. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dances With Wolves in China's Wild West

Dances With Wolves in China's Wild West

AFP (Oct. 23, 2014) One man is on a mission to boost the population of wolves in China's violence-wracked far west. The animal - symbol of the Uighur minority there - is under threat with a massive human resettlement program in the region. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Breakfast Debate: To Eat Or Not To Eat?

Breakfast Debate: To Eat Or Not To Eat?

Newsy (Oct. 23, 2014) Conflicting studies published in the same week re-ignited the debate over whether we should be eating breakfast. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Weird-Looking Dinosaur Solves 50-Year-Old Mystery

Weird-Looking Dinosaur Solves 50-Year-Old Mystery

Newsy (Oct. 23, 2014) You've probably seen some weird-looking dinosaurs, but have you ever seen one this weird? It's worth a look. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins