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A baby crystal is born

Date:
January 23, 2012
Source:
American Institute of Physics
Summary:
Scientists determine the smallest possible cubic lead sulfide cluster that exhibits the same coordination (a key structural property) as bigger bulk crystals.

Lead sulfide (PbS) forms when an equal number of lead and sulfur atoms exchange electrons and bond together in cubic crystals. Now scientists have determined that a structure comprising 32 lead-sulfur pairs is the smallest possible cubic arrangement that exhibits the same coordination as bulk lead sulfide. (The coordination number is the number of nearest neighbors each atom in the crystal has.)

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Researchers from McNeese State University in Louisiana, John Hopkins University in Maryland, and the University of Konstanz in Germany identified the "baby crystal" by running computer simulations that calculated the energy and geometry of different structures containing different numbers of atoms.

They found that (PbS)32 is the smallest stable unit that possesses both the same cubic structure and coordination number as the bulk crystal.

The researchers also experimentally tested their theoretical findings by gently depositing (PbS)32 clusters on a graphite surface where they could easily migrate and merge together to form larger nanoscale structures. By using scanning tunneling microscope images to measure the dimensions of the resultant lead sulfide nano-blocks, the researchers confirmed that the (PbS)32 "baby crystals" had indeed stacked together as theoretically predicted.

The results, published in the AIP's Journal of Chemical Physics, show how small lead sulfide crystals come together to form larger units and could help provide a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the formation of solids.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Institute of Physics. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. B. Kiran, Anil K. Kandalam, Rameshu Rallabandi, Pratik Koirala, Xiang Li, Xin Tang, Yi Wang, Howard Fairbrother, Gerd Gantefoer, Kit Bowen. (PbS)32: A baby crystal. The Journal of Chemical Physics, 2012; 136 (2): 024317 DOI: 10.1063/1.3672166

Cite This Page:

American Institute of Physics. "A baby crystal is born." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 January 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120118111212.htm>.
American Institute of Physics. (2012, January 23). A baby crystal is born. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120118111212.htm
American Institute of Physics. "A baby crystal is born." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120118111212.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

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