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Keeping wood preservatives where they belong: In the wood

Date:
April 11, 2012
Source:
Michigan Technological University
Summary:
Pressure-treated wood is great stuff, but the chemicals used to preserve it from decay can leach out, where they can be toxic to bugs, fungi and other hapless creatures. Now, scientists are using nanotechnology to keep the chemicals inside the wood where they belong.

Pressure-treated wood is great stuff, but the chemicals used to preserve it from decay can leach out, where they can be toxic to bugs, fungi and other hapless creatures that have the bad luck to be in the neighborhood. Now, a team of Michigan Technological University scientists has used nanotechnology to keep the chemicals inside the wood where they belong.

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"It's a new method that uses nanoparticles to deliver preservatives into the lumber," said chemistry professor Patricia Heiden. "In our experiments, it reduced the leaching of biocides by 90 percent."

The nanoparticles are tiny spheres of gelatin or chitosan (a material found in the shells of shrimp and other shellfish) chemically modified to surround the fungicide tebuconazole. The little spheres require no special handling.

"You just pressure-treat the wood in the usual way," Heiden said.

The initial tests show that the nanoparticle-treated wood is just as resistant to rot and insects as conventionally treated lumber. The researchers are now testing the wood in the warm, wet weather of Hawaii.

The research is funded by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Other Michigan Tech researchers contributing to the project are chemistry PhD student Xiaochu Ding and, from the School of Forest Research and Environmental Science, Research Engineer/Scientist II Dana Richter, Senior Research Engineer/Scientist Glenn Larkin, Assistant Research Scientist Erik Keranen and Professor Peter Laks.


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The above story is based on materials provided by Michigan Technological University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Michigan Technological University. "Keeping wood preservatives where they belong: In the wood." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 April 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120411205259.htm>.
Michigan Technological University. (2012, April 11). Keeping wood preservatives where they belong: In the wood. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120411205259.htm
Michigan Technological University. "Keeping wood preservatives where they belong: In the wood." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120411205259.htm (accessed January 26, 2015).

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