Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Halogen bonding helps design new drugs

Date:
June 5, 2012
Source:
Universitaet Tübingen
Summary:
Halogens particularly chlorine, bromine, and iodine – have a unique quality which allows them to positively influence the interaction between molecules. This “halogen bonding” has been employed in the area of materials science for some time, but is only now finding applications in the life sciences.

Part of the crystal structure of the mutated tumor suppressor p53 bound to a reactivating small molecule interacting with the binding pocket via a halogen bond (purple dotted line). Compounds of the new class of substances reactivate p53 in affected cancer cells.
Credit: Prof. Frank Böckler

Halogens ‒ particularly chlorine, bromine, and iodine -- have a unique quality which allows them to positively influence the interaction between molecules. This "halogen bonding" has been employed in the area of materials science for some time, but is only now finding applications in the life sciences.

Scientists at the University of Tübingen, in cooperation with the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge / UK, have now demonstrated that halogen bonding can be used to identify potential drug candidates for cancer treatment. Dr. Rainer Wilcken and Prof. Frank Böckler in collaboration with Dr. Andreas Joerger and Prof. Sir Alan Fersht, have presented a new concept of pharmaceutical research: fragment-based development of lead compounds based on halogen bonding.

The method uses specially designed fragment libraries to screen for binders to biological target structures such as proteins or DNA in order to develop new drugs.

To date, halogens -- particularly the heavier bromine and iodine -- have been underrepresented in such fragment libraries. Now, for the first time, scientists at the Pharmaceutical Institute at the University of Tübingen have described the design and application of halogen-enriched fragment libraries (HEFLibs) in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Universitaet Tübingen. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rainer Wilcken, Xiangrui Liu, Markus O. Zimmermann, Trevor J. Rutherford, Alan R. Fersht, Andreas C. Joerger, Frank M. Boeckler. Halogen-Enriched Fragment Libraries as Leads for Drug Rescue of Mutant p53. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2012; 134 (15): 6810 DOI: 10.1021/ja301056a

Cite This Page:

Universitaet Tübingen. "Halogen bonding helps design new drugs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 June 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120605121639.htm>.
Universitaet Tübingen. (2012, June 5). Halogen bonding helps design new drugs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120605121639.htm
Universitaet Tübingen. "Halogen bonding helps design new drugs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120605121639.htm (accessed April 19, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Vermont Goat Meat Gives Refugees Taste of Home

Vermont Goat Meat Gives Refugees Taste of Home

AP (Apr. 18, 2014) — Dairy farmers and ethnic groups in Vermont are both benefiting from a unique collaborative effort that's feeding a growing need for fresh and affordable goat meat. (April 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
First Ever 'Female Penis' Discovered In Animal Kingdom

First Ever 'Female Penis' Discovered In Animal Kingdom

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) — Not only are these newly discovered bugs' sex organs reversed, but they also mate for up to 70 hours. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) — A new report shows rates of two foodborne infections increased in the U.S. in recent years, while salmonella actually dropped 9 percent. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Great British Farmland Boom

The Great British Farmland Boom

Reuters - Business Video Online (Apr. 17, 2014) — Britain's troubled Co-operative Group is preparing to cash in on nearly 18,000 acres of farmland in one of the biggest UK land sales in decades. As Ivor Bennett reports, the market timing couldn't be better, with farmland prices soaring over 270 percent in the last 10 years. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins