Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Experimental insulin drug prevents low blood sugar

Date:
June 25, 2012
Source:
Endocrine Society
Summary:
An experimental insulin drug prevented low blood sugar among diabetic patients more often than a popular drug on the market, a new study finds.

An experimental insulin drug prevented low blood sugar among diabetic patients more often than a popular drug on the market, a new study finds. The results were presented June 24 at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston.

Nearly 26 million people in the United States have diabetes, which can cause blood sugar, or glucose, to climb to dangerously high levels. While treatment with the hormone insulin can help control blood sugar, it sometimes leads to abnormally low levels, or hypoglycemia. Symptoms of low blood sugar include headaches, tremors, and even seizures, so it is critical to develop medications that control blood sugar without causing extreme drops.

"Diabetes is an increasingly common disease, and many patients fail to achieve their treatment goals due to a fear of hypoglycemia," said lead investigator Daniel Einhorn, M.D., medical director at Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute, and clinical professor of medicine at the University of California San Diego. "This puts them at risk of developing diabetes complications."

While both medications in this large-scale analysis decreased blood-sugar concentrations, the experimental drug, degludec, caused fewer incidents of low blood sugar, especially at night-time, compared to glargine. Overall, low blood-sugar levels occurred 14 percent less often among degludec patients than among those receiving glargine, also known as Lantus. At night, low blood sugar occurred 37 percent less often among degludec than glargine recipients.

Sixteen weeks after the study, degludec patients had even fewer incidents of low blood sugar. During this maintenance period, the condition occurred 21 percent less frequently, overall, and 43 percent less often at night. No major complications were reported.

"This study suggests that blood glucose can be effectively lowered by degludec, with a lower risk for hypoglycemia compared to currently available insulins," Einhorn said. "It is therefore possible that treatment with degludec can improve patient outcomes by limiting the side effects associated with insulin use."

Investigators analyzed data from seven separate clinical trials. Two of these trials focused on type 1 diabetes, in which the body produces insufficient insulin to control blood-sugar levels. The other five trials examined the most common form of diabetes, known as type 2, in which the body both responds inadequately to insulin and produces inadequate amounts of the hormone.

More than 3,000 participants were randomly assigned to receive either degludec or glargine once a day for 26 or 52 weeks. Of the total number, 2,899 patients received degludec, and 1,431 were given glargine. Nearly half of all patients on both drugs achieved targeted levels of blood-sugar control.

While the investigators are presenting this study for the first time, results from the previous seven trials were previously publicized. Novo Nordisk, the maker of degludec, funded the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Endocrine Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Endocrine Society. "Experimental insulin drug prevents low blood sugar." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 June 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120625125038.htm>.
Endocrine Society. (2012, June 25). Experimental insulin drug prevents low blood sugar. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120625125038.htm
Endocrine Society. "Experimental insulin drug prevents low blood sugar." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120625125038.htm (accessed April 18, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, April 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

AP (Apr. 17, 2014) President Barack Obama gave a briefing Thursday announcing 8 million people have signed up under the Affordable Care Act. He blasted continued Republican efforts to repeal the law. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) A recent study links apathetic feelings to a smaller brain. Researchers say the results indicate a need for apathy screening for at-risk seniors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard suggests even casual marijuana use can alter your brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins