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New species of wirerush from the wetlands in northern New Zealand

Date:
July 9, 2012
Source:
Pensoft Publishers
Summary:
The northern part of the North Island of New Zealand is marked at approximately 38 degrees S latitude by a distinct ecological boundary known as the "kauri line". This region forms the southern distributional limit of many plants and is the warmest part of New Zealand. A number of endemic plants are found there. Ecologists have recently discovered a new species of wirerush from peatlands north of the "kauri line."

Morphological characteristics of Empodisma robustum. A) Vegetative shoot with attached leaves and flowers (actual size) B) Rhizomes with emerging vegetative shoots (2.5 actual size) C) Vegetative shoot with attached pistillate flower D) Pistillate flower with attached bracts E) Gynoecium F) Mature nut G) Vegetative shoot with attached staminate spikelet H) Staminate flower with attached bracts I) Staminate flower. Scale bar = 1 mm.
Credit: Steve Wagstaff and Beverly Clarkson, Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License

The northern part of the North Island of New Zealand is marked at approximately 38 S latitude by a distinct ecological boundary known as the "kauri line." This region forms the southern distributional limit of many plants and is the warmest part of New Zealand. A number of endemic plants are found there. Ecologists have recently discovered a new species of wirerush from peatlands north of the "kauri line."

Wetlands serve vital ecological functions by providing wildlife habitat, carbon storage, nutrient regulation and water balance. New Zealand has a number of wetland types. The peat-forming wetlands are dominated by a plant commonly known as wirerush (Empodisma, Restionaceae). The name Empodisma is derived from a Greek word meaning "to hinder." Both the common and the Greek name describe its dense scrambling growth form. Empodisma is in the southern hemisphere family Restionaceae.

The horizontal root systems of wirerush branch profusely forming finely divided rootlets with long-lived root hairs. In wirerush bogs, the underlying peat is formed largely from the remains of the root systems, stems bases and trapped plant litter. The peat mass absorbs water like a sponge. In peat bogs, incoming rainfall and atmospheric particles are the only source of nutrients. These are removed from the flow of water in the porous upper layers of peat. This may be an adaptive feature in nutrient-poor environments such as peat bogs.

Steve Wagstaff and Beverly Clarkson recognize three species of wirerush including the newly described species Empodisma robustum. Empodisma robustum is only found in peatlands in northern New Zealand, whereas E. minus is found in central and southern New Zealand and eastern Australia, and E. gracillimum is restricted to western Australia. Their study provides an account of the origin, diversification and ecology of the genus with descriptive keys and illustrations.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Pensoft Publishers. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Steven Wagstaff, Beverly Clarkson. Systematics and ecology of the Australasian genus Empodisma (Restionaceae) and description of a new species from peatlands in northern New Zealand. PhytoKeys, 2012; 13 (0): 39 DOI: 10.3897/phytokeys.13.3259

Cite This Page:

Pensoft Publishers. "New species of wirerush from the wetlands in northern New Zealand." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120709121620.htm>.
Pensoft Publishers. (2012, July 9). New species of wirerush from the wetlands in northern New Zealand. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120709121620.htm
Pensoft Publishers. "New species of wirerush from the wetlands in northern New Zealand." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120709121620.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

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