Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Inspired by genetics, chemistry finally takes hold of its own code: Chemists can attain more complex supramolecular structures?

Date:
August 19, 2012
Source:
Université de Genève
Summary:
Nature proves every day that it is both complex and efficient. Organic chemists are envious of it; their conventional tools confine them to simpler achievements. These limitations could become a thing of the past. New research offers a new kind of code to chemists, allowing them to access new levels of complexity.

Nature proves every day that it is both complex and efficient. Organic chemists are envious of it; their conventional tools confine them to simpler achievements. Thanks to the work of professor Stefan Matile's team from the University of Geneva, these limitations could become a thing of the past. His publication in the Nature Chemistry journal indeed offers a new kind of code to chemists, allowing them to access new levels of complexity.

Stefan Matile opts for sincerity. For him, if organic chemistry is often fond of simplifying its functional systems, it is because it is mostly impossible for it to construct and manage molecular architectures as complex as those produced with tremendous efficiency in nature. "It's a fact," says the UNIGE professor and NCCR Chemical Biology member, "that we are far from being able to match the genius of nature."

Where the complexity arises

The specialist attributes the genetic code to this genius of nature. "It is rather simple because it is based on four foundations -- adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine (A, C, G, and T). The double helix structure of DNA is also quite simple. The complexity arises mainly from the cell's transfer of this information from one stage to the next."

Stefan Matile has long believed that a code also exists in organic chemistry and must be discovered, which he is convinced he has achieved with the assistance of his colleague, Edvinas Orentas.

"I must admit that this work is extremely complicated, fundamental, and theoretical," the professor continues. "But I also think it's quite revolutionary, especially if we are able to implement it on a practical level."

Laying the foundation

In fact, thanks to him, organic chemists may be able to stop laboriously constructing their functional systems, atom by atom, link by link. The code would allow them to write two-dimensional maps, a relatively simple and manageable challenge. The complexity of three-dimensional systems would then be created by transcribing this scheduled information; a transcription that, with supporting proof, has a reliability of 97%, so close to perfection. A powerful way to approach the complexity of nature.

From now on, Stefan Matile's group will try to put this code into practice to produce surface materials like the ones used to make organic solar cells, which mimic the processes at work during photosynthesis. "We don't yet know if it will work exactly as we expect, but the adventure promises to be exciting."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Université de Genève. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Edvinas Orentas, Marco Lista, Nai-Ti Lin, Naomi Sakai, Stefan Matile. A quantitative model for the transcription of 2D patterns into functional 3D architectures. Nature Chemistry, 2012; DOI: 10.1038/nchem.1429

Cite This Page:

Université de Genève. "Inspired by genetics, chemistry finally takes hold of its own code: Chemists can attain more complex supramolecular structures?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 August 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120819153737.htm>.
Université de Genève. (2012, August 19). Inspired by genetics, chemistry finally takes hold of its own code: Chemists can attain more complex supramolecular structures?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120819153737.htm
Université de Genève. "Inspired by genetics, chemistry finally takes hold of its own code: Chemists can attain more complex supramolecular structures?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120819153737.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Chameleon Camouflage to Give Tanks Cloaking Capabilities

Chameleon Camouflage to Give Tanks Cloaking Capabilities

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) — Inspired by the way a chameleon changes its colour to disguise itself; scientists in Poland want to replace traditional camouflage paint with thousands of electrochromic plates that will continuously change colour to blend with its surroundings. The first PL-01 concept tank prototype will be tested within a few years, with scientists predicting that a similar technology could even be woven into the fabric of a soldiers' clothing making them virtually invisible to the naked eye. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jet Sales Lift Boeing Profit 18 Pct.

Jet Sales Lift Boeing Profit 18 Pct.

Reuters - Business Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) — Strong jet demand has pushed Boeing to raise its profit forecast for the third time, but analysts were disappointed by its small cash flow. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Internet of Things Aims to Smarten Your Life

Internet of Things Aims to Smarten Your Life

AP (Oct. 22, 2014) — As more and more Bluetooth-enabled devices are reaching consumers, developers are busy connecting them together as part of the Internet of Things. (Oct. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
What Is Magic Leap, And Why Is It Worth $500M?

What Is Magic Leap, And Why Is It Worth $500M?

Newsy (Oct. 22, 2014) — Magic Leap isn't publicizing much more than a description of its product, but it’s been enough for Google and others to invest more than $500M. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins