Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New molecular interactions behind the inhibition of TGF beta-signaling described

Date:
August 24, 2012
Source:
Institute for Research in Biomedicine-IRB
Summary:
Researchers describe new molecular interactions behind the inhibition of TGF beta-signaling.

The ubiquitin ligase Nedd4L (large molecule) binds constitutively and directly to the Smad7 protein (green sticks) at the specific WW2 domain discovered by the researchers.
Credit: Image courtesy of Institute for Research in Biomedicine-IRB

Researchers headed by Maria Macias an ICREA researcher at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and Joan Massagué, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York, have identified a new molecular mechanism that plays a crucial role in the control of the activation of certain genes associated with cancer.

Through detailed structural and biochemical studies, the researchers identified a key domain present in a family of proteins called Smads, whose binding determines whether the transcription of genes controlled by the TGF-beta and BMP signaling cascades will be bound by activators or labeled for degradation. These processes are critical to the correct development and maintenance of tissues and organisms.

When looking at inhibitory Smads , the researchers found that the specific domain binds directly and constitutively to their targets. This is in contrast to what happens with receptor-activated Smads, where the proteins must first undergo processing by phosphorylation -- a chemical change whereby the proteins are first activated and then labeled for degradation after completing their transcriptional function. The study appears online August 23 in the journal Structure.

Smads are key proteins in the signaling pathways of the hormones TGF-beta and BMP, which are known to participate in the control of stem cell pluripotency and differentiation and in the development and maintenance of metazoan organisms. In this study, the researchers looked at the interactions of Smad7 -- a protein inhibitor of TGF-beta signaling -- with molecules implicated in the cascade, including three ubiquitin ligases and YAP, a transcription coactivator. They identified the domains in the four proteins that interact with the same region of Smad7 and quantified these interactions in terms of affinity values.

Previous work by the groups on a similar type of protein, called receptor-activated Smads, has shown that in order for transcription to take place, these Smads undergo the process of phosphorylation. In this study, which focuses on inhibitory Smads, the researchers found that this step of molecular processing was not necessary and that the four proteins bind constitutively and directly to the targets.

The TGF-beta pathway is tightly regulated. Its regulation includes a feedback process whereby the two sets of Smads play complementary roles in the same signaling cascade, as they can either inhibit or trigger gene transcription, depending on cell type and the physiological needs of the tissue or organism. As with most biological processes, achieving a fine balance between the two is key, since uncontrolled gene transcription is a hallmark of serious diseases such as cancer. This latest discovery helps to shed light on how organisms achieve this balance.

One of the keys to success of this project was the unique combination of perspectives and methodologies that the partners contributed. Macias' team at IRB Barcelona used a mixture of biophysical and molecular biology techniques to decipher the minute structures of subdomains within the proteins at the atomic level. "The problem," she says, "is that we are looking at small sections of the full proteins in vitro, isolated from their cellular environment. Using techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, we are able to see the details down to the atoms in the binding sites. But because we zoom in so closely, we can lose sight of what the interactions we characterize can actually mean for the function of the entire protein in the cell."

Massagué's group at MSKCC was able to take each of Macias' detailed conformational changes and, using mammalian cells and full length proteins, see the effects these changes had in the cells. "Merging the detailed and bigger pictures is a difficult but key step to understanding the nature of biological processes, and to identifying what happens in disease," he says. "Detailed information on the structures of molecules involved in fundamental processes, such as that provided by this study, can tell us where to look to take to control when things go wrong."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Institute for Research in Biomedicine-IRB. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Eric Aragón, Nina Goerner, Qiaoran Xi, Tiago Gomes, Sheng Gao, Joan Massagué, Maria J. Macias. Structural Basis for the Versatile Interactions of Smad7 with Regulator WW Domains in TGF-β Pathways. Structure, 2012; DOI: 10.1016/j.str.2012.07.014

Cite This Page:

Institute for Research in Biomedicine-IRB. "New molecular interactions behind the inhibition of TGF beta-signaling described." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 August 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120824082432.htm>.
Institute for Research in Biomedicine-IRB. (2012, August 24). New molecular interactions behind the inhibition of TGF beta-signaling described. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120824082432.htm
Institute for Research in Biomedicine-IRB. "New molecular interactions behind the inhibition of TGF beta-signaling described." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120824082432.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Cadaver Dogs Aid Search for More Victims of Suspected Indiana Serial Killer

Cadaver Dogs Aid Search for More Victims of Suspected Indiana Serial Killer

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 21, 2014) — Police in Gary, Indiana are using cadaver dogs to search for more victims after a suspected serial killer confessed to killing at least seven women. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
White Lion Cubs Unveiled to the Public

White Lion Cubs Unveiled to the Public

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Oct. 21, 2014) — Visitors to Belgrade zoo meet a pair of three-week-old lion cubs for the first time. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Cadaver Dog' Sniffs out Human Remains

'Cadaver Dog' Sniffs out Human Remains

AP (Oct. 21, 2014) — Where's a body buried? Buster's nose can often tell you. He's a cadaver dog, specially trained to find human remains and increasingly being used by law enforcement and accepted in courts. These dogs are helping solve even decades-old mysteries. (Oct. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
White Lion Cubs Born in Belgrade Zoo

White Lion Cubs Born in Belgrade Zoo

AFP (Oct. 20, 2014) — Two white lion cubs, an extremely rare subspecies of the African lion, were recently born at Belgrade Zoo. They are being bottle fed by zoo keepers after they were rejected by their mother after birth. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins