Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Coronary angioplasty improves cardiac arrest survival

Date:
October 20, 2012
Source:
European Society of Cardiology (ESC)
Summary:
Coronary angioplasty improves survival in all patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest, according to new research.

Coronary angioplasty improves survival in all patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest, according to research presented at the Acute Cardiac Care Congress 2012. The study was presented by Dr Annamaria Nicolino from the Santa Corona General Hospital in Pietra Ligure, Italy.

The Acute Cardiac Care Congress 2012 is the first annual meeting of the newly launched Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACCA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). It takes place during 20-22 October in Istanbul, Turkey, at the Istanbul Lufti Kirdar Convention and Exhibition Centre (ICEC).

Out of hospital cardiac arrest is a leading cause of mortality and acute coronary occlusion is the leading cause of cardiac arrest. It is well known that when an electrocardiogram (ECG) shows that a patient has ST elevation, primary angiography must be done as soon as possible. If severe coronary disease is found, coronary angioplasty with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is performed to open the blocked vessel.

But Dr Nicolino said: "There is controversy about what to do when a patient with out of hospital cardiac arrest has a normal ECG that does not show ST elevation. ESC Clinical Practice Guidelines are inconclusive -- they say to consider performing coronary angiography but they don't say 'do it' or 'don't do it'."

She added: "Some previous studies have found that if the ECG is normal (no ST elevation) the patient can still have severe coronary disease and therefore needs a coronary angiography, followed by coronary angioplasty, to clear the blocked vessel."

The current study aimed to discover whether performing urgent coronary angiography, and PCI if required, would improve survival in all patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest (both those with ST elevation and those without).

The study included 70 patients who had out of hospital cardiac arrest between 2006 and 2009. Successful urgent coronary angiography and PCI improved hospital survival in all patients with acute coronary syndrome. The treatment increased hospital survival rates in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) from 51% to 83% (p=0.003) and in non-STEMI (NSTEMI) patients from 55% to 81% (p=0.004).

"In our study, a successful urgent coronary angioplasty improved hospital survival in patients with STEMI and NSTEMI," said Dr Nicolino. "All patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest, if there is no non-cardiac cause, must have an urgent coronary angiography followed by coronary angioplasty if there is coronary disease."

Non-cardiac causes of cardiac arrest which should be ruled out before performing coronary angiography are trauma, brain haemorrhage and metabolic problems such as severe hypoglycaemia.

Dr Nicolino added: "ECG results can be misleading -- we found that ECG detected just one-third of acute coronary syndrome in NSTEMI patients. This means that even if the ECG is not showing ST elevation, you cannot rule out an acute coronary syndrome. Coronary angiography should be performed urgently to see if there is any acute coronary disease which needs treatment with PCI."

Post-resuscitation neurologic injury (PNI) was the biggest complication. This can occur if resuscitation is not performed early enough, since the brain's blood supply stops during cardiac arrest. The 32.8% of patients who had PNI were at the greatest risk of death. Early signs of PNI were associated with underuse of coronary angioplasty and PCI.

Provided there was no neurological injury, MI patients who had angioplasty after cardiac arrest achieved the same one-year survival rates as patients with MI alone.

The first heart rhythm was a ventricular fibrillation (VF) or a ventricular tachycardia (VT) in 62% of patients. Most of these patients had an acute coronary syndrome (STEMI or NSTEMI). The incidence of VF and VT was the same in STEMI and NSTEMI patients. "For many years we have thought that patients with STEMI have a greater arrhythmic risk than NSTEMI patients," said Dr Nicolino. "But we found that both STEMI and NSTEMI patients are at high risk of arrhythmias."

She added: "If the first recorded rhythm is a VF or a VT an acute coronary syndrome is highly probable and it's important to perform a coronary angiography immediately without waiting for a diagnosis of infarction (using an enzyme test)."

Dr Nicolino concluded: "Patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest must be managed by cardiologists, intensive care doctors and anaesthesiologists. This team can save the brain from injury using cooling therapy, and save the heart and life of the patient using coronary angioplasty."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

European Society of Cardiology (ESC). "Coronary angioplasty improves cardiac arrest survival." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121020162530.htm>.
European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2012, October 20). Coronary angioplasty improves cardiac arrest survival. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121020162530.htm
European Society of Cardiology (ESC). "Coronary angioplasty improves cardiac arrest survival." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121020162530.htm (accessed September 19, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, September 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

AP (Sep. 19, 2014) A federal jury has convicted three people in connection with an outbreak of salmonella poisoning five years ago that sickened hundreds of people and was linked to a number of deaths. (Sept. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How The 'Angelina Jolie Effect' Increased Cancer Screenings

How The 'Angelina Jolie Effect' Increased Cancer Screenings

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) Angelina's Jolie's decision to undergo a preventative mastectomy in 2013 inspired many women to seek early screenings for the disease. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Cost of Ebola

The Cost of Ebola

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 18, 2014) As Sierra Leone prepares for a three-day "lockdown" in its latest bid to stem the spread of Ebola, Ciara Lee looks at the financial implications of fighting the largest ever outbreak of the disease. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins