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Vegetable compound could become ingredient to treating leukemia

Date:
December 12, 2012
Source:
Baylor College of Medicine
Summary:
A concentrated form of a compound called sulforaphane found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables has been shown to reduce the number of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in the lab setting, said researchers.

It looks like your mother was on to something when she said, "Eat your vegetables!"

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A concentrated form of a compound called sulforaphane found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables has been shown to reduce the number of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in the lab setting, said researchers at Baylor College of Medicine. The findings appear in the current edition of PLOS ONE.

"Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a type of cancer of the white blood cells common in children," said Dr. Daniel Lacorazza, assistant professor of pathology & immunology. "There is about an 80 percent cure rate, but some children don't respond to treatment. For those cases, we are in need of alternative treatments."

Lacorazza and his colleagues focused on purified sulforaphane, a natural compound found in broccoli believed to have both preventive and therapeutic properties in solid tumors. Studies have shown that people who eat a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables have a lower risk of some cancers.

"There have not been definitive studies showing how this compound interacts with blood cancers," Lacorazza said.

To study how this compound would act on acute lymphoblastic leukemia, researchers, led by Dr. Koramit Suppipat, lead author of the study who performed this work while a clinical fellow in the Texas Children's Cancer and Hematology Centers, incubated human-derived leukemic cell lines and primary lymphoblasts from pediatric patients with the compound. The cancer cells died while the healthy cells obtained from healthy donors were unaffected. Studies tested in pre-clinical mouse models showed similar results.

Lacorazza said the compound works by entering the cells and reacting with certain proteins. More studies will be needed, but researchers believe this compound could one day be used as a treatment option in combination with current therapies. They also are working to determine which proteins are affected by sulforaphane and how. This could identify a new treatment target that might be affected by other types of cancer cells as well.

"Sulforaphane is a natural product. However, what we used in this study is a concentrated purified form," said Lacorazza. "So while eating cruciferous vegetables is good for you, it will not have the same effect as what we saw in the lab."

Others who contributed to the study include Chun Shik Park and Ye Shen, both with the department of pathology & immunology at BCM; and Xiao Zhu, with the Summer Medical and Research Training Program (SMART) at BCM. Lacorazza is also with the department of pediatrics, BCM. Suppipat is currently a clinical instructor in the department of medicine at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Baylor College of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Koramit Suppipat, Chun Shik Park, Ye Shen, Xiao Zhu, H. Daniel Lacorazza. Sulforaphane Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells. PLoS ONE, 2012; 7 (12): e51251 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0051251

Cite This Page:

Baylor College of Medicine. "Vegetable compound could become ingredient to treating leukemia." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 December 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121212205602.htm>.
Baylor College of Medicine. (2012, December 12). Vegetable compound could become ingredient to treating leukemia. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121212205602.htm
Baylor College of Medicine. "Vegetable compound could become ingredient to treating leukemia." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121212205602.htm (accessed February 28, 2015).

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