Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Measuring dispersal: How well are soft-sediment invertebrate communities connected on the seafloor?

Date:
December 13, 2012
Source:
Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland)
Summary:
Different types of disturbances to the seafloor can affect both the invertebrates inhabiting them and the critical ecosystem functions they provide us (e.g. nutrient cycling, oxygenation, food for fish). Biologists have now investigated the dispersal of invertebrates, critical in both the recovery process following a disturbance and in maintaining patterns of diversity on the seafloor.

Different types of disturbances to the seafloor can affect both the invertebrates inhabiting them and the critical ecosystem functions they provide us (e.g. nutrient cycling, oxygenation, food for fish). Sebastian Valanko working at the Marine Research Centre of the Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE) has together with colleagues investigated dispersal of invertebrates, critical in both the recovery process following a disturbance and in maintaining patterns of diversity on the seafloor. Sebastian's PhD thesis will be defended at 12.00 on December 19, 2012 at Εbo Akademi University in Finland.

Measuring dispersal underwater

Valanko's thesis deals with connectivity, by investigating dispersal strategies and mechanisms of benthic invertebrates. Such knowledge on dispersal is scarce, due to the difficulties in actually measuring dispersal directly in nature, and dispersal has not previously been quantified in the Baltic Sea. Different trap-types were used to capture dispersing invertebrates at different sites, while in parallel measuring waves and currents. This required some 1015 dives by Sebastian and his research team in the archipelago close to Tvδrminne Zoological Station, in the south of Finland.

Dispersal is essential for recovery of diversity after disturbance

In one experiment recovery was investigated over a year at several sites. In response to small-scale disturbance, initial recruitment is by nearby-dominant species after which other species will arrive from successively further away. Species also differ in their dispersal potential. In practice, this implies that if only one locality is protected it may not be sufficient to ensure that diversity is maintained. Equally important are the other source locations from which individuals continuously arrive from, and therefore maintaining overall patterns of diversity.

Importance of PhD thesis findings

Sebastian's thesis complements more theoretical studies in ecology in demonstrating that having an understanding of how and when individuals are dispersing relative to underlying environmental heterogeneity is key to interpreting how patterns of diversity change across different spatial scales. Such information from nature is critical when predicting responses to, for example, different types of disturbances or management actions in conservation.

The research project has partly been funded by the Academy of Finland.

Thesis: http://www.doria.fi/handle/10024/86172


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland). "Measuring dispersal: How well are soft-sediment invertebrate communities connected on the seafloor?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 December 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121213084937.htm>.
Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland). (2012, December 13). Measuring dispersal: How well are soft-sediment invertebrate communities connected on the seafloor?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121213084937.htm
Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland). "Measuring dispersal: How well are soft-sediment invertebrate communities connected on the seafloor?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121213084937.htm (accessed August 22, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Friday, August 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Endangered Red Wolves Face Uncertain Future

Endangered Red Wolves Face Uncertain Future

AP (Aug. 22, 2014) — A federal judge temporarily banned coyote hunting to save endangered red wolves, but local hunters say that the wolf preservation program does more harm than good. Meanwhile federal officials are reviewing its wolf program in North Carolina. (Aug. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Farm Resurgence Grows With Younger Crowd

Farm Resurgence Grows With Younger Crowd

AP (Aug. 22, 2014) — New England farms are seeing a surge in younger farm hands as the 'buy local' food movement grows across the country. (Aug. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) — An experimental drug used to treat Marburg virus in rhesus monkeys could give new insight into a similar treatment for Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Terrifying City-Dwelling Spiders Are Bigger And More Fertile

Terrifying City-Dwelling Spiders Are Bigger And More Fertile

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) — According to a new study, spiders that live in cities are bigger, fatter and multiply faster. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins