Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

3-D color X-Ray imaging radically improved for identifying contraband, corrosion or cancer

Date:
January 7, 2013
Source:
Manchester University
Summary:
Scientists have developed a camera that can be used to take powerful three dimensional color X-ray images, in near real-time, without the need for a synchrotron X-ray source.

Scientists at The University of Manchester have developed a camera that can be used to take powerful three dimensional colour X-ray images, in near real-time, without the need for a synchrotron X-ray source.

Its ability to identify the composition of the scanned object could radically improve security screening at airports, medical imaging, aircraft maintenance, industrial inspection and geophysical exploration.

The X-Ray system developed by Professor Robert Cernik and colleagues from The School of Materials can identify chemicals and compounds such as cocaine, semtex, precious metals or radioactive materials even when they're contained inside a relatively large object like a suitcase.

The method could also be extended to detect strain in fabricated components, for example in aircraft wings, and it can be used to image corrosion processes and chemical changes. In healthcare, the system can be used to detect abnormal tissue types from biopsy samples. In geophysical exploration it could be used to quickly analyse the content of core samples taken from bore holes.

In a recent experiment the team used the technology to X-ray a USB dongle that controls webcams. They were able to identify the different elements and components inside the dongle by analysing the energy sensitive radiographs and fluorescence patterns. The elements or components were highlighted in different colours to clearly identify them to the system operators. In this case the X-ray showed bromine, barium, silver, tin and zirconium.

The results of the tests have been published in the journal Analyst.

Professor Robert Cernik says: "The fact that we can now use this technology in a laboratory setting is a substantial step forward. When we first developed the idea five years ago we needed the power of a synchrotron to produce the X-Rays. In addition we only had access to silicon based detectors. This is a problem because silicon is a light atom and will not stop the high energy X-rays that come through large objects. Now we can achieve the same imaging results with an 80 x 80 pixel camera (made from cadmium zinc telluride) that supports real-time hyperspectral X-ray imaging up to very high energies."

He continues: "Current imaging systems such as spiral CAT scanners do not use all the information contained in the X-ray beam. We can use all the wavelengths present to give a colour X-ray image in a number of different imaging geometries. This method is often called hyperspectral imaging because it gives extra information about the material structure at each voxel (3D equivalent of a pixel) of the 3D image. This extra information can be used to fingerprint the material present at each point in a 3D image."

As well as providing more information about the object being X-rayed, this new technique also decreases the time it takes to create a three dimensional image. Rather than building up lots of separate images (mapping), the new system creates the image in one very simple scanning motion which now only takes several minutes.

This has implications for using the X-ray system for medical purposes, as Professor Cernik explains: "The fact the image can be taken at the same time as using more conventional methods and on the same timescale means more information can be gathered from biopsy samples. This will more accurately differentiate between normal and abnormal tissue types reducing mis-diagnosis."

Professor Cernik is now seeking industrial partners for collaborative projects to refine the X-ray technology for each specific application such as security, aerospace and medical imaging. The team is also close to creating the first colour CT scanner which could dramatically improve diagnosis for a range of conditions or improve security at airports.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Manchester University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Simon D. M. Jacques, Christopher K. Egan, Matthew D. Wilson, Matthew C. Veale, Paul Seller, Robert J. Cernik. A laboratory system for element specific hyperspectral X-ray imaging. The Analyst, 2013; 138 (3): 755 DOI: 10.1039/c2an36157d

Cite This Page:

Manchester University. "3-D color X-Ray imaging radically improved for identifying contraband, corrosion or cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 January 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130107082224.htm>.
Manchester University. (2013, January 7). 3-D color X-Ray imaging radically improved for identifying contraband, corrosion or cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130107082224.htm
Manchester University. "3-D color X-Ray imaging radically improved for identifying contraband, corrosion or cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130107082224.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Britain Testing Driverless Cars on Roadways

Britain Testing Driverless Cars on Roadways

AP (July 30, 2014) British officials said on Wednesday that driverless cars will be tested on roads in as many as three cities in a trial program set to begin in January. Officials said the tests will last up to three years. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
7 Ways to Use Toothpaste: Howdini Hacks

7 Ways to Use Toothpaste: Howdini Hacks

Howdini (July 30, 2014) Fresh breath and clean teeth are great, but have you ever thought, "my toothpaste could be doing more". Well, it can! Lots of things! Howdini has 7 new uses for this household staple. Video provided by Howdini
Powered by NewsLook.com
Amid Drought, UCLA Sees Only Water

Amid Drought, UCLA Sees Only Water

AP (July 30, 2014) A ruptured 93-year-old water main left the UCLA campus awash in 8 million gallons of water in the middle of California's worst drought in decades. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smartphone Powered Paper Plane Debuts at Airshow

Smartphone Powered Paper Plane Debuts at Airshow

AP (July 30, 2014) Smartphone powered paper airplane that was popular on crowdfunding website KickStarter makes its debut at Wisconsin airshow (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins