Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Mechanisms involved in resistance to bacteria Salmonella

Date:
February 6, 2013
Source:
Elhuyar Fundazioa
Summary:
Researchers have studied a specific protein type that activates the formation of biofilm in Salmonella and regulates bacterial motility.

In their natural environment bacteria develop by forming communities of micro-organisms called biofilms that afford them greater resistance.These biofilms on farms and premises where food is processed lead to considerable economic losses besides being a potential source of contamination and transmission of the pathogen. In her PhD thesis,Violeta Zorraquino-Salvo has studied a specific protein type that activates the formation of biofilm in Salmonella and regulates bacterial motility."Having a better idea of the mechanisms involved in these processes will help to design new, more effective strategies for preventing the formation of biofilm and its potential harm in the clinical, food and industrial ambit," points out the researcher.

Two decades ago it was discovered that a small molecule (the so-called c-di-GMP) could on its own hamper motility and activate the formation of biofilm."This molecule is part of a signal transduction system:there are different sensory membranes on the membrane of the bacteria that pick up stimuli from the outside and transduce them into different intracellular levels of c-di-GMP, thus regulating different biological processes like biofilm formation."In the first part of her thesis Zorraquino removed all the sensory proteins from the Salmonella's genome."We created a mutant Salmonella incapable of picking up stimuli from the medium in which it lives and therefore of producing biofilm under any circumstances."After that, each sensory protein was inserted one by one to be able to analyse, under different ambient conditions, how each one contributed to the formation of biofilm."We showed that under each condition tested, only some proteins are active, so each one is most likely responsible for the formation of biofilm when a given condition is present."

These results have enabled researchers to get a better idea about the mechanism by which Salmonella activates the formation of biofilm."We have generated new knowledge that could be used to design new strategies to help to prevent the formation of biofilm in our factories and on our farms," as Violeta Zorraquino pointed out.

Bacterial motility

The second part of her research focussed on studying the effect of the same molecule (c-di-GMP) in another of Salmonella's biological processes:bacterial motility.A bacterium is capable of moving freely in a liquid medium by rotating its flagella, and when it reaches a suitable surface, it sticks to it and begins to create the biofilm."There is an intervening step -- between being motile and sticking to a surface -- in which the bacterium has to stop the rotation of its flagella completely. We have discovered what is responsible for this intervening step: cellulose, which is a component of biofilm, and the synthesis of which is activated in the presence of the c-di-GMP molecule."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Elhuyar Fundazioa. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Elhuyar Fundazioa. "Mechanisms involved in resistance to bacteria Salmonella." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130206093902.htm>.
Elhuyar Fundazioa. (2013, February 6). Mechanisms involved in resistance to bacteria Salmonella. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130206093902.htm
Elhuyar Fundazioa. "Mechanisms involved in resistance to bacteria Salmonella." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130206093902.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Raw: Elephant Undergoes Surgery in Tbilisi Zoo

Raw: Elephant Undergoes Surgery in Tbilisi Zoo

AP (Sep. 18, 2014) Grand the elephant has successfully undergone surgery to remove a portion of infected tusk at Tbilisi Zoo in Georgia. British veterinary surgeons used an electric drill to extract the infected piece. (Sept. 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chimp Violence Study Renews Debate On Why They Kill

Chimp Violence Study Renews Debate On Why They Kill

Newsy (Sep. 17, 2014) The study weighs in on a debate over whether chimps are naturally violent or become that way due to human interference in the environment. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Some Tobacco Farmers Thrive Amid Challenges

Some Tobacco Farmers Thrive Amid Challenges

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) The South's tobacco country is surviving, and even thriving in some cases, as demand overseas keeps growers in the fields of one of America's oldest cash crops. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Given Rare Glimpse of 350-Kilo Colossal Squid

Scientists Given Rare Glimpse of 350-Kilo Colossal Squid

AFP (Sep. 16, 2014) Scientists say a female colossal squid weighing an estimated 350 kilograms (770 lbs) and thought to be only the second intact specimen ever found was carrying eggs when discovered in the Antarctic. Duration: 00:47 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins