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Strange spaghetti-shaped creature is missing link: Discovery pushes fossil record back 200 million years

Date:
March 13, 2013
Source:
University of Toronto
Summary:
Canada's 505 million year-old Burgess Shale fossil beds, located in Yoho National Park, have yielded yet another major scientific discovery -- this time with the unearthing of a strange phallus-shaped creature.

Two individuals of Harrimania planktophilus, a modern enteropneust (harrimaniid) worm. Proboscis to the left. Total length of a relaxed and uncoiled animal is approximately 32 mm.
Credit: C.B. Cameron, Université de Montréal.

Canada's 505 million year-old Burgess Shale fossil beds, located in Yoho National Park, have yielded yet another major scientific discovery -- this time with the unearthing of a strange spaghetti-shaped creature.

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It's a discovery that pushes back the fossil record of a group of creatures known as enteropneusts by 200 million years -- and provides the crucial "missing link" in an important evolutionary transformation.

"Unlike animals with teeth and bones, these spaghetti-shaped creatures were soft-bodied, so the fossil record for them is extremely scarce," said Jean-Bernard Caron, associate professor of Earth Sciences and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology at the University of Toronto and curator of invertebrate palaeontology at the Royal Ontario Museum.

"Our analysis of Spartobranchus tenuis, a creature previously unknown to science, pushes the fossil record of the enteropneusts back by 200 million years and illuminates our understanding of the early evolution of this group of organisms," Caron said.

Caron is the lead author of the study published online in the journal Nature March 13 2013 which found Spartobranchus tenuis is a member of the acorn worms group. Acorn worms are marine animals that belong to the phylum hemichordates, a group which is closely related to todays sea stars and sea urchins. While Spartobranchus tenuis is long extinct, other species of acorn worms thrive in the fine sands and mud of deep and shallow waters in present-day ecosystems.

Since the discovery of hemichordates in the 19th century, some of the biggest questions in hemichordate evolution have focused on the group's origins and the relationship between its two main branches: the enteropneusts and pterobranchs. Enteropneusts and pterobranchs look very different, yet share many genetic and developmental characteristics that reveal an otherwise unexpected close relationship.

"Spartobranchus tenuis represents a crucial missing link that serves not only to connect the two main hemichordate groups but helps to explain how an important evolutionary transformation was achieved," said Caron. "Our study suggests that primitive enteropneusts developed a tubular structure -- the smoking gun -- which has been retained over time in modern pterobranchs."

Hemichordates also share many of the same characteristics as chordates -- a group of animals that includes humans -- with the name hemichordate roughly translating to 'half a chordate.'

Spartobranchus tenuis probably fed on small particles of matter at the bottom of the oceans.

"There are literally thousands of specimens at the Walcott Quarry in Yoho National Park, so it's possible Spartobranchus tenuis may have played an important role in recycling organic matter in the early Burgess Shale environment, similar to the ecological service provided by earth worms today on land," said Caron.

Detailed analysis suggests Spartobranchus tenuis (illustration at right by Marianne Collins) had a flexible body consisting of a short proboscis, collar and narrow elongate trunk terminating in a bulbous structure, which may have served as an anchor.

The largest complete specimens examined were 10 centimetres long with the proboscis accounting for about half a centimetre. A large proportion of these worms was preserved in tubes, of which some were branched, suggesting the tubes were used as a dwelling structure.

Other members of the Spartobranchus tenuis research team are Simon Conway Morris of the University of Cambridge and Christopher B. Cameron of the Université de Montréal. Last year Conway Morris and Caron published a well-publicized study on Pikaia, believed to be one of the planet's first human relatives.

The Burgess Shale is found in Yoho National Park, part of the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks World Heritage Site, and is one of the most important fossil deposits for understanding the origin and early evolution of animals that took place during the Cambrian Explosion starting about 542 million years ago.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Toronto. The original article was written by Kim Luke. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jean-Bernard Caron, Simon Conway Morris, Christopher B. Cameron. Tubicolous enteropneusts from the Cambrian period. Nature, 2013; DOI: 10.1038/nature12017

Cite This Page:

University of Toronto. "Strange spaghetti-shaped creature is missing link: Discovery pushes fossil record back 200 million years." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 March 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130313142526.htm>.
University of Toronto. (2013, March 13). Strange spaghetti-shaped creature is missing link: Discovery pushes fossil record back 200 million years. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130313142526.htm
University of Toronto. "Strange spaghetti-shaped creature is missing link: Discovery pushes fossil record back 200 million years." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130313142526.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

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Strange Phallus-Shaped Creature Pushes Fossil Record Back 200 Million Years

Mar. 13, 2013 — Scientists have unearthed a major scientific discovery - a strange phallus-shaped creature they found in Canada’s Burgess Shale fossil beds, located in Yoho National Park. The fossils were found in ... read more

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