Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Maternal diabetes impairs methylation of imprinted gene in oocytes

Date:
March 20, 2013
Source:
Society for the Study of Reproduction
Summary:
For the first time, researchers have shown that poorly controlled maternal diabetes has an adverse effect on methylation of the maternal imprinting gene Peg3, contributing to impaired development in offspring.

For the first time, researchers have shown that poorly controlled maternal diabetes has an adverse effect on methylation of the maternal imprinting gene Peg3, contributing to impaired development in offspring.

Related Articles


Previous studies have revealed that offspring of diabetic mothers display a higher incidence of malformations and fetal death, even when a one-cell embryo is transplanted from a diabetic to a non-diabetic mother. Diabetic mothers' oocytes tend to exhibit reduced glucose metabolism, compromised communication between cumulus cells and oocytes, mitochondrial malfunction, and a decreased ovulation rate, all of which can be traced back to reduced gene expression in the embryos.

Qing-Yuan Sun and Zhao-Jia Ge of the Chinese Academy of Sciences hypothesized that the reduced gene expression results from disturbed DNA re-methylation during oogenesis and oocyte maturation. The team bred and examined three different mouse populations: one with spontaneously occurring diabetes, one with diabetes induced by STZ injection, and one without diabetes. After mating on Day 15, the diabetic mice presented with reduced pregnancy rates (approx. 74% vs. 100% in non-diabetic mice) and increased embryo death rates (approx. 16% vs. 0%), consistent with previous reports.

Focusing on the methylation patterns of one paternally methylated gene (H19) and two maternally methylated genes (Peg3 and Snrpn), the team found that none showed impaired methylation until 35 days after STZ injection; however, embryo development and number of offspring were already affected on Day 15. On Day 35, methylation of Peg3 was significantly decreased, with an unmethylated oocyte rate nearly 22% higher in both types of diabetic mice compared to controls. H19 remained unaffected and effects on Snrpn were not significant.

As for the female offspring of diabetic mothers, their oocytes did not appear to have any methylation abnormalities; however, due to the difficulty of producing offspring conceived after Day 15, it will be extremely difficult to determine whether those females are similarly unaffected.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for the Study of Reproduction. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ge ZJ, Liang XW, Guo L, Liang QX, Luo SM, Wang YP, Wei YC, Han ZM, Schatten H, Suna QY. Maternal diabetes causes alterations of DNA methylation statuses of some imprinted genes in murine oocytes. Biol Reprod, 20 March 2013; (in press) DOI: 10.1095/biolreprod.112.105981

Cite This Page:

Society for the Study of Reproduction. "Maternal diabetes impairs methylation of imprinted gene in oocytes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 March 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130320155226.htm>.
Society for the Study of Reproduction. (2013, March 20). Maternal diabetes impairs methylation of imprinted gene in oocytes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130320155226.htm
Society for the Study of Reproduction. "Maternal diabetes impairs methylation of imprinted gene in oocytes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130320155226.htm (accessed December 20, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) It's hard to resist those delicious but fattening carbs we all crave during the winter months, but there are some ways to stay satisfied without consuming the extra calories. Vanessa Freeman (@VanessaFreeTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) The new year is coming and nothing will energize you more for 2015 than protein-filled foods. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) gives his favorite high protein foods that will help you build muscle, lose fat and have endless energy. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins