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New research findings open door to zinc-oxide-based UV lasers, LED devices

Date:
April 23, 2013
Source:
North Carolina State University
Summary:
Researchers have solved a long-standing materials science problem, making it possible to create new semiconductor devices using zinc oxide -- including efficient ultraviolet lasers and LED devices for use in sensors and drinking water treatment, as well as new ferromagnetic devices.

Researchers from North Carolina State University have solved a long-standing materials science problem, making it possible to create new semiconductor devices using zinc oxide (ZnO) -- including efficient ultraviolet (UV) lasers and LED devices for use in sensors and drinking water treatment, as well as new ferromagnetic devices.

"The challenge of using ZnO to make these devices has stumped researchers for a long time, and we've developed a solution that uses some very common elements: nitrogen, hydrogen and oxygen," says Dr. Lew Reynolds, co-author of a paper describing the research and a teaching associate professor of materials science and engineering at NC State. "We've shown that it can be done, and how it can be done -- and that opens the door to a suite of new UV laser and LED technologies," says Dr. Judith Reynolds, a research scientist at NC State and lead author of the paper.

To make laser and LED technologies, you need both "n-type" materials and "p-type" materials. N-type materials contain an abundance of free electrons. P-type materials have "holes" that attract those free electrons. But the holes in the p-type materials have a lower energy state, which means that electrons release their excess energy in the form of light as they travel from the n-type material to the p-type material. The shedding of excess energy at the so-called "p-n junction" is what produces light in lasers and LED devices.

Researchers have been interested in using ZnO to create these devices because ZnO produces UV light, and because ZnO can be used to make devices with relatively fewer unwanted defects than other UV emitters- which means the resulting lasers or LEDs would be more energy efficient.

However, researchers had been unable to consistently produce stable p-type materials out of ZnO. Now researchers have solved that problem by introducing a specific "defect complex," via a unique set of growth and annealing procedures, in the ZnO. The defect complex looks different from a normal ZnO molecule. The zinc atom is missing and a nitrogen atom (attached to a hydrogen atom) substitutes for the oxygen atom. These defect complexes are dispersed throughout the ZnO material and serve as the "holes" that accept the electrons in p-type materials.

Not only does the research illustrate how to create p-type materials from ZnO, but the defect complex allows the ZnO p-n junction to function efficiently -- and produce UV light -- at room temperature.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by North Carolina State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. J. G. Reynolds, C. L. Reynolds, A. Mohanta, J. F. Muth, J. E. Rowe, H. O. Everitt, D. E. Aspnes. Shallow acceptor complexes in p-type ZnO. Applied Physics Letters, 2013; 102 (15): 152114 DOI: 10.1063/1.4802753

Cite This Page:

North Carolina State University. "New research findings open door to zinc-oxide-based UV lasers, LED devices." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130423110815.htm>.
North Carolina State University. (2013, April 23). New research findings open door to zinc-oxide-based UV lasers, LED devices. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130423110815.htm
North Carolina State University. "New research findings open door to zinc-oxide-based UV lasers, LED devices." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130423110815.htm (accessed April 21, 2014).

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