Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Bacterial infection in mosquitoes renders them immune to malaria parasites

Date:
May 9, 2013
Source:
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
Summary:
Scientists have established an inheritable bacterial infection in malaria-transmitting Anopheles mosquitoes that renders them immune to malaria parasites. Specifically, the scientists infected the mosquitoes with Wolbachia, a bacterium common among insects that previously has been shown to prevent malaria-inducing Plasmodium parasites from developing in Anopheles mosquitoes.

Scientists funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, have established an inheritable bacterial infection in malaria-transmitting Anopheles mosquitoes that renders them immune to malaria parasites. Specifically, the scientists infected the mosquitoes with Wolbachia, a bacterium common among insects that previously has been shown to prevent malaria-inducing Plasmodium parasites from developing in Anopheles mosquitoes. Before now, researchers had been unable to create mosquitoes with a stable Wolbachia infection that passed consistently from mother to offspring.

In this study, led by Zhiyong Xi, Ph.D., at Michigan State University, the researchers focused on Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes, the primary malaria carrier in the Middle East and South Asia. The scientists injected Wolbachia into male and female embryos of A. stephensi and, once they matured, mated the adult females with uninfected male mosquitoes. A stable Wolbachia infection was maintained for 34 generations of mosquitoes, at which time the study ended. The researchers also introduced Wolbachia infection into uninfected adult mosquitoes in a series of experiments in which infected female mosquitoes comprised 5 percent, 10 percent or 20 percent of the mosquito population. In all three experiments, 100 percent of the mosquitoes were infected within eight generations, supporting the potential of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes as a malaria control strategy. Similar approaches have been used successfully to control dengue, another mosquito-borne disease, in certain settings.

In their examination of how Wolbachia affects Plasmodium parasites, the researchers found that the bacterium kills the parasites both in the mosquito midgut, where the parasites mature, and in the salivary glands, from which the parasites are transmitted to humans via mosquito bites. The scientists hypothesize that Wolbachia infection causes the formation of unstable compounds known as reactive oxygen species (ROS), which inhibit the development of the parasites. Future studies might examine whether Plasmodium can become resistant to ROS and explore ways to integrate Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes with existing malaria control strategies, the researchers write.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. G. Bian, D. Joshi, Y. Dong, P. Lu, G. Zhou, X. Pan, Y. Xu, G. Dimopoulos, Z. Xi. Wolbachia Invades Anopheles stephensi Populations and Induces Refractoriness to Plasmodium Infection. Science, 2013; 340 (6133): 748 DOI: 10.1126/science.1236192

Cite This Page:

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. "Bacterial infection in mosquitoes renders them immune to malaria parasites." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 May 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130509142052.htm>.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. (2013, May 9). Bacterial infection in mosquitoes renders them immune to malaria parasites. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130509142052.htm
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. "Bacterial infection in mosquitoes renders them immune to malaria parasites." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130509142052.htm (accessed September 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

AP (Sep. 19, 2014) A federal jury has convicted three people in connection with an outbreak of salmonella poisoning five years ago that sickened hundreds of people and was linked to a number of deaths. (Sept. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How The 'Angelina Jolie Effect' Increased Cancer Screenings

How The 'Angelina Jolie Effect' Increased Cancer Screenings

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) Angelina's Jolie's decision to undergo a preventative mastectomy in 2013 inspired many women to seek early screenings for the disease. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Cost of Ebola

The Cost of Ebola

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 18, 2014) As Sierra Leone prepares for a three-day "lockdown" in its latest bid to stem the spread of Ebola, Ciara Lee looks at the financial implications of fighting the largest ever outbreak of the disease. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

More Coverage


Using Bacteria to Stop Malaria

May 9, 2013 Mosquitoes are deadly efficient disease transmitters. New research however, demonstrates that they also can be part of the solution for preventing diseases such as ... read more
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins