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Thermal limit for animal life redefined by first lab study of deep-sea vent worms

Date:
May 29, 2013
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Forty-two may or may not be the answer to everything, but it likely defines the temperature limit where animal life thrives, according to the first laboratory study of heat-loving Pompeii worms from deep-sea vents.

Forty-two may or may not be the answer to everything, but it likely defines the temperature limit where animal life thrives, according to the first laboratory study of heat-loving Pompeii worms from deep-sea vents.

The research was published May 29 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Bruce Shillito and colleagues from the University Pierre and Marie Curie, France.

The worms, named Alvinella pompejana, colonize black smoker chimney walls at deep-sea vents, thrive at extremes of temperature and pressure, and have thus far eluded scientists' attempts to bring them to the surface alive for further research. Many previous studies conducted at these sites has suggested the worms may be able to thrive at temperatures of 60 C (140 F) or higher. As Shillito explains, "It is because several previous papers had come to this conclusion that Alvinella had become some sort of thermal exception in the scientific world. Before these studies, it was long agreed that 50 C was the limit at which animal life survived."

In this new study, researchers used a technique that maintains the extreme pressure essential to the worms' survival during their extraction, allowing them to bring Pompeii worms to their labs for testing. They found that prolonged exposure to the 50-55 C range induced lethal tissue damage, revealing that the worms did not experience long-term exposures to temperatures above 50 C in their natural environment. However, their studies found that the temperature optimum for survival of the worms was still well over 42 C, ranking them among the most heat-loving animals known.


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The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Juliette Ravaux, G้rard Hamel, Magali Zbinden, Aur้lie A. Tasiemski, Isabelle Boutet, Nelly L้ger, Arnaud Tanguy, Didier Jollivet, Bruce Shillito. Thermal Limit for Metazoan Life in Question: In Vivo Heat Tolerance of the Pompeii Worm. PLoS ONE, 2013; 8 (5): e64074 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0064074

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Thermal limit for animal life redefined by first lab study of deep-sea vent worms." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 May 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130529190940.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2013, May 29). Thermal limit for animal life redefined by first lab study of deep-sea vent worms. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130529190940.htm
Public Library of Science. "Thermal limit for animal life redefined by first lab study of deep-sea vent worms." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130529190940.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

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