Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Corticosteroid injections may help injured NFL players return to play sooner

Date:
July 12, 2013
Source:
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM)
Summary:
Corticosteroid injections may speed-up the return time for National Football League (NFL) players suffering high ankle sprains, according to new research. Players treated with these injections typically returned 40% faster or approximately 10 days earlier than those not receiving the same treatment.

Corticosteroid injections may speed-up the return time for National Football League (NFL) players suffering high ankle sprains, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL. Players treated with these injections typically returned 40% faster or approximately 10 days earlier than those not receiving the same treatment.

Related Articles


"After examining players with stable high ankle sprains over an eight-year period, we discovered those treated with corticosteroid injections returned to play within an average 15 days, as compared to 25 days for those not treated similarly," noted Alfred A. Mansour, MD, from UT-Houston Orthopaedics in Houston, Texas. "For high-level athletes such as NFL players, returning to play 10 days sooner can have a significant impact personally and for the team."

The study examined 31 players from two NFL teams, with 13 players receiving a corticosteroid injection within 72 hours of an ankle injury. All players involved in the study went through a standard non-operative rehabilitation program, including crutches, weight-bearing activity as tolerated, NSAIDs treatment, and a progressive return to play training.

"While previous research explores the extended recovery involved with these injuries, our data offers a new treatment option that may be more effective for NFL players," noted Mansour. "Further research can help confirm this, though we are excited to discover ways to help athletes at the professional level."

The authors reported no complications in players treated with the corticosteroid injections.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). "Corticosteroid injections may help injured NFL players return to play sooner." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 July 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130712084207.htm>.
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). (2013, July 12). Corticosteroid injections may help injured NFL players return to play sooner. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130712084207.htm
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). "Corticosteroid injections may help injured NFL players return to play sooner." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130712084207.htm (accessed November 29, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, November 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — One man hopes his invention -– a machine that produces cheap sanitary pads –- will help empower Indian women. Duration: 01:51 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — In Africa's only biosafety level 4 laboratory, scientists have been carrying out experiments on bats to understand how virus like Ebola are being transmitted, and how some of them resist to it. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

Newsy (Nov. 28, 2014) — WHO cites four studies that say Ebola can still be detected in semen up to 82 days after the onset of symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins