Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Corticosteroid injections may help injured NFL players return to play sooner

Date:
July 12, 2013
Source:
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM)
Summary:
Corticosteroid injections may speed-up the return time for National Football League (NFL) players suffering high ankle sprains, according to new research. Players treated with these injections typically returned 40% faster or approximately 10 days earlier than those not receiving the same treatment.

Corticosteroid injections may speed-up the return time for National Football League (NFL) players suffering high ankle sprains, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL. Players treated with these injections typically returned 40% faster or approximately 10 days earlier than those not receiving the same treatment.

"After examining players with stable high ankle sprains over an eight-year period, we discovered those treated with corticosteroid injections returned to play within an average 15 days, as compared to 25 days for those not treated similarly," noted Alfred A. Mansour, MD, from UT-Houston Orthopaedics in Houston, Texas. "For high-level athletes such as NFL players, returning to play 10 days sooner can have a significant impact personally and for the team."

The study examined 31 players from two NFL teams, with 13 players receiving a corticosteroid injection within 72 hours of an ankle injury. All players involved in the study went through a standard non-operative rehabilitation program, including crutches, weight-bearing activity as tolerated, NSAIDs treatment, and a progressive return to play training.

"While previous research explores the extended recovery involved with these injuries, our data offers a new treatment option that may be more effective for NFL players," noted Mansour. "Further research can help confirm this, though we are excited to discover ways to help athletes at the professional level."

The authors reported no complications in players treated with the corticosteroid injections.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). "Corticosteroid injections may help injured NFL players return to play sooner." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 July 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130712084207.htm>.
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). (2013, July 12). Corticosteroid injections may help injured NFL players return to play sooner. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130712084207.htm
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). "Corticosteroid injections may help injured NFL players return to play sooner." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130712084207.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) An experimental drug used to treat Marburg virus in rhesus monkeys could give new insight into a similar treatment for Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

AP (Aug. 21, 2014) Contains graphic content. He's only 17. But Johntrell Bowles has wanted to be a doctor from a young age, despite the odds against him. He was recently the youngest participant in a cadaver program at the Indiana University NW medical school. (Aug. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
American Ebola Patients Released: What Cured Them?

American Ebola Patients Released: What Cured Them?

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) It's unclear whether the American Ebola patients' recoveries can be attributed to an experimental drug or early detection and good medical care. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) According to a new study, elderly people might have trouble sleeping because of the loss of a certain group of neurons in the brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins