Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Biologists may have identified gene central to development, reproduction and aging

Date:
August 29, 2013
Source:
Université de Fribourg
Summary:
Biologists have been looking at a threadworm gene which also occurs in humans. This gene could be central to a genetic system which is responsible for development, reproduction and the aging process.

Biologists at the University of Fribourg have been looking at a threadworm gene which also occurs in humans. This gene could be central to a genetic system which is responsible for development, reproduction and the ageing process.

Related Articles


Ageing involves a deterioration in physiological functions which inevitably leads to death. The risk of contracting age-related diseases such as cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders is increased by the body's deterioration. Latest advances in research permit the isolation of genetic factors which control not only ageing but also the occurrence of age-related diseases.

Prof. Fritz Müller, Dr. Chantal Wicky and their research team have highlighted the importance of the gene let-418/Mi2 in the Caenorhabditis elegans worm because it regulates ageing and stress resistance as well as being essential for development and reproduction. The researchers have discovered that when the gene is deactivated in adult worms in the laboratory, they live longer and are considerably more resistant to stress. The gene forms part of a genetic system which plays a key beneficial role in growth and reproduction. But as soon as these stages are over, the effects become harmful.

Thanks to their collaboration with Prof. Simon Sprecher's recently formed research team at the University of Fribourg, the researchers were able to establish that this gene also operates as an ageing and stress regulator in the case of flies and plants. This indicates that the mechanism of action of this gene has been preserved over the course of evolution and may function similarly in humans. Deactivating the gene after the reproductive stage is over would enable the human body to enjoy a significant increase in life expectancy since its level of resilience would rise and the occurrence of age-related illnesses would diminish. The study of such factors -- which have negative as well as positive effects according to the stage of life -- represents a huge potential for human medicine.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Université de Fribourg. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Véronique De Vaux, Catherine Pfefferli, Myriam Passannante, Khaoula Belhaj, Alina von Essen, Simon G. Sprecher, Fritz Müller, Chantal Wicky. TheCaenorhabditis elegansLET-418/Mi2 plays a conserved role in lifespan regulation. Aging Cell, 2013; DOI: 10.1111/acel.12129

Cite This Page:

Université de Fribourg. "Biologists may have identified gene central to development, reproduction and aging." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 August 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130829110029.htm>.
Université de Fribourg. (2013, August 29). Biologists may have identified gene central to development, reproduction and aging. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130829110029.htm
Université de Fribourg. "Biologists may have identified gene central to development, reproduction and aging." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130829110029.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

U.S. Ebola Response Measures Demonstrated

U.S. Ebola Response Measures Demonstrated

AP (Oct. 31, 2014) — Officials in the Washington area showed off Ebola response measures being taken at Dulles International Airport and the National Institutes of Health. (Oct. 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Fauci Says Ebola Risk in US "essentially Zero"

Fauci Says Ebola Risk in US "essentially Zero"

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) — NIAID Director Anthony Fauci said the risk of Ebola becoming an epidemic in the U.S. is essentially zero Thursday at the Washington Ideas Forum. He also said an Ebola vaccine will be tested in West Africa in the next few months. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nurse Defies Ebola Quarantine With Bike Ride

Nurse Defies Ebola Quarantine With Bike Ride

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) — A nurse who vowed to defy Maine's voluntary quarantine for health care workers who treated Ebola patients followed through on her promise Thursday, leaving her home for an hour-long bike ride. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pot-Infused Edibles Raise Concerns in Colorado

Pot-Infused Edibles Raise Concerns in Colorado

AFP (Oct. 30, 2014) — Colorado may have legalized marijuana for recreational use, but the debate around the decision still continues, with a recent - failed - attempt to ban cannabis-infused edibles. Duration: 01:53 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins