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Oldest land-living animal from Gondwana found

Date:
September 3, 2013
Source:
University of the Witwatersrand
Summary:
Scientists have discovered the oldest known land-living animal from Gondwana in a remote part of the Eastern Cape. It is a 350-million-year-old fossilized scorpion.

Stinger of the scorpion.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of the Witwatersrand

A postdoctoral fellow from Wits University has discovered the oldest known land-living animal from Gondwana in a remote part of the Eastern Cape. Dr Robert Gess, from the Evolutionary Studies Institute at Wits, discovered the 350-million-year-old fossilised scorpion from rocks of the Devonian Witteberg Group near Grahamstown. This unique specimen, which is a new species, has been called Gondwanascorpio emzantsiensis.

His discovery has been published in the peer reviewed journal African Invertebrate.

Explaining his discovery, Gess said that early life was confined to the sea and the process of terrestrialisation -- the movement of life onto land -- began during the Silurian Period roughly 420 million years ago. The first wave of life to move out from water onto land consisted of plants, which gradually increased in size and complexity throughout the Devonian Period.

This initial colonisation of land was closely followed by plant and debris-eating invertebrate animals such as primitive insects and millipedes. By the end of the Silurian period about 416 million years ago, predatory invertebrates such as scorpions and spiders were feeding on the earlier colonists of land.

By the Carboniferous period (360 million years ago), early vertebrates -- our four-legged ancestors -had in turn left the water and were feeding on the invertebrates. Although we knew that Laurasia -the single northern landmass then comprising what is today North America and Asia -- was inhabited by diverse invertebrates by the Late Silurian and during the Devonian, this supercontinent was at the time separated from the southerly positioned Gondwana by a deep ocean.

Evidence on the earliest colonisation of land animals has up till now come only from the northern hemisphere continent of Laurasia, and there has been no evidence that Gondwana was inhabited by land living invertebrate animals at that time," explained Gess.

For the first time we know for certain that not just scorpions, but whatever they were preying on were already present in the Devonian. We now know that by the end the Devonian period Gondwana also, like Laurasia, had a complex terrestrial ecosystem, comprising invertebrates and plants which had all the elements to sustain terrestrial vertebrate life that emerged around this time or slightly later," said Gess.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of the Witwatersrand. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Robert W. Gess. The earliest record of terrestrial animals in Gondwana: A scorpion from the Famennian (Late Devonian) Witpoort Formation of South Africa. African Invertebrates, Vol. 54 (2): 373-379; 28 August 2013

Cite This Page:

University of the Witwatersrand. "Oldest land-living animal from Gondwana found." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 September 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130903102101.htm>.
University of the Witwatersrand. (2013, September 3). Oldest land-living animal from Gondwana found. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130903102101.htm
University of the Witwatersrand. "Oldest land-living animal from Gondwana found." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130903102101.htm (accessed August 22, 2014).

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