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Making hydrogen cheaply by imitating bacteria? Unique chemistry in hydrogen catalysts revealed

Date:
October 24, 2013
Source:
University of California - Davis
Summary:
Making hydrogen easily and cheaply is a dream goal for clean, sustainable energy. Bacteria have been doing exactly that for billions of years, and now chemists are revealing how they do it, and perhaps opening ways to imitate them.

This hydrogen-generating cluster of iron (brown) and sulfur (yellow) atoms, with side groups of carbon monoxide (gray/red) and cyanide (gray/blue), could be a key to future fuel sources.
Credit: Protein Data Bank/courtesy graphic

Making hydrogen easily and cheaply is a dream goal for clean, sustainable energy. Bacteria have been doing exactly that for billions of years, and now chemists at the University of California, Davis, and Stanford University are revealing how they do it, and perhaps opening ways to imitate them.

A study published Oct. 25 in the journal Science describes a key step in assembling the hydrogen-generating catalyst.

"It's pretty interesting that bacteria can do this," said David Britt, professor of chemistry at UC Davis and co-author on the paper. "We want to know how nature builds these catalysts -- from a chemist's perspective, these are really strange things."

The bacterial catalysts are based on precisely organized clusters of iron and sulfur atoms, with side groups of cyanide and carbon monoxide. Those molecules are highly toxic unless properly controlled, Britt noted.

The cyanide and carbon monoxide groups were known to come from the amino acid tyrosine, Britt said. Jon Kuchenreuther, a postdoctoral researcher in Britt's laboratory, used a technique called electron paramagnetic resonance to study the structure of the intermediate steps.

They found a series of chemical reactions involving a type of highly reactive enzyme called a radical SAM enzyme. The tyrosine is attached to a cluster of four iron atoms and four sulfur atoms, then cut loose leaving the cyanide and carbon monoxide groups behind.

"People think of radicals as dangerous, but this enzyme directs the radical chemistry, along with the production of normally poisonous CO and CN, along safe and productive pathways," Britt said.

Kuchenreuther, Britt and colleagues also used another technique, Fourier Transform Infrared to study how the iron-cyanide-carbon monoxide complex is formed. That work will be published separately.

"Together, these results show how to make this interesting two-cluster enzyme," Britt said. "This is unique, new chemistry."

Britt's laboratory houses the California Electron Paramagnetic Resonance center (CalEPR), the largest center of its kind on the west coast.

Other authors on the paper are: at UC Davis, postdoctoral researchers William Myers and Troy Stich, project scientist Simon George and graduate student Yaser NejatyJahromy; and at Stanford University, James Swartz, professor of chemical engineering and bioengineering. The work was supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California - Davis. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. J. M. Kuchenreuther, W. K. Myers, T. A. Stich, S. J. George, Y. NejatyJahromy, J. R. Swartz, R. D. Britt. A Radical Intermediate in Tyrosine Scission to the CO and CN- Ligands of FeFe Hydrogenase. Science, 2013; 342 (6157): 472 DOI: 10.1126/science.1241859

Cite This Page:

University of California - Davis. "Making hydrogen cheaply by imitating bacteria? Unique chemistry in hydrogen catalysts revealed." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131024143311.htm>.
University of California - Davis. (2013, October 24). Making hydrogen cheaply by imitating bacteria? Unique chemistry in hydrogen catalysts revealed. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131024143311.htm
University of California - Davis. "Making hydrogen cheaply by imitating bacteria? Unique chemistry in hydrogen catalysts revealed." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131024143311.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

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