Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New method quickly determines if chest pain is acute coronary syndrome

Date:
November 4, 2013
Source:
Karolinska Institutet
Summary:
Researchers have tested a new method for quickly ruling out acute myocardial infarction or other serious acute coronary disease in Emergency Department patients complaining of chest pains. The method seems able to reduce the percentage of cardiac patients who need to be kept in the hospital under observation by 10 to 20 percent. A number of hospitals in the the cities of Stockholm and Uppsala will start applying the method this winter.

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have tested a new method for quickly ruling out acute myocardial infarction or other serious acute coronary disease in Emergency department patients complaining of chest pains. The method, which is presented in a new doctoral thesis, seems able to reduce the percentage of cardiac patients who need to be kept in the hospital under observation by 10 to 20 percent. A number of hospitals in the the cities of Stockholm and Uppsala will start applying the method this winter.

Roughly 20 percent of all patients seeking emergency medical care at Swedish hospitals do so because of chest pains. It is difficult for doctors to promptly rule out myocardial infarction or other serious coronary problems, and even though only 8 to 10 percent of these individuals actually have a heart attack, almost half of them have to be kept in for observation. This means that many people with a perfectly benign cause of chest pain become an unnecessary burden on hospital resources.

In her doctoral thesis, Dr Dina Melki at Karolinska University Hospital's cardiology clinic in Stockholm has examined a new method of quickly ruling out a myocardial infarction or other serious coronary disease. The method involves combining the results of new sensitive assays for blood levels of troponin T (a substance released from the heart during a heart attack) with a risk-score system that takes into account the patient's medical history, age and ECG. Using this method, doctors have been able to confidently rule out serious acute coronary disease in 60 percent of the patients within their first two hours of arrival at hospital.

"The method seems to improve the way theses patients are taken care of, as it brings fewer risks and saves hospital resources, as fewer patients have to be kept under observation," says Dr Melki. "So 10 to 20 percent of those kept in today could go home instead."

The four studies comprising her thesis are based on data from almost 48,000 patients. This winter, Stockholm's and Uppsala's Accident and Emergency clinics will be embarking on a project to adopt the method in their daily clinical routines. The risk-score system is based on a point system developed by a Dutch research team.

The thesis was financed with a grant from the Heart-Lung foundation and project funds made available through an agreement between Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm County Council (ALF funding). The thesis defense was held on Friday 1 November 2013. The supervisor was docent Dr Tomas Jernberg.

The thesis can be seen at: http://hdl.handle.net/10616/41743


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Karolinska Institutet. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Karolinska Institutet. "New method quickly determines if chest pain is acute coronary syndrome." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131104101114.htm>.
Karolinska Institutet. (2013, November 4). New method quickly determines if chest pain is acute coronary syndrome. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131104101114.htm
Karolinska Institutet. "New method quickly determines if chest pain is acute coronary syndrome." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131104101114.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, October 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) The World Health Organization has declared Nigeria free of Ebola. Health experts credit a bit of luck and the government's initial response. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Another Study Suggests Viagra Is Good For The Heart

Another Study Suggests Viagra Is Good For The Heart

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) An ingredient in erectile-dysfunction medications such as Viagra could improve heart function. Perhaps not surprising, given Viagra's history. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Worries End for Dozens on U.S. Watch Lists

Ebola Worries End for Dozens on U.S. Watch Lists

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 20, 2014) Forty-three people who had contact with Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the U.S., were cleared overnight of twice-daily monitoring after 21 days of showing no symptoms. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Fauci: Ebola Protocols to Focus on Training

Fauci: Ebola Protocols to Focus on Training

AP (Oct. 20, 2014) Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says he expects revised CDC protocols on Ebola to focus on training, observation and ensuring health care workers are more protected. (Oct. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins