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Discovery may lead to new treatments for allergic diseases

Date:
November 11, 2013
Source:
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Summary:
A collaboration among researchers in Israel and the United States has resulted in the discovery of a new pathway with broad implications for treating allergic diseases -- particularly eosinophil-associated disorders. Researchers have discovered how this pathway kills eosinophils before they can cause havoc. Eosinophils are normal cellular blood components, but when the body produces too many eosinophils they can cause a variety of eosinophilic disorders.

A collaboration among researchers in Israel and the United States has resulted in the discovery of a new pathway that has broad implications for treating allergic diseases -- particularly eosinophil-associated disorders.

The researchers from Tel Aviv University and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have discovered how this pathway kills eosinophils before they can cause havoc. Eosinophils are normal cellular components of the blood, but when the body produces too many eosinophils they can cause a variety of eosinophilic disorders. These are disorders involving chronic inflammation resulting in tissue damage, often in the gastrointestinal system.

The study is published online in the journal Nature Immunology.

"The fundamental knowledge we have gained may one day yield new therapies to treat devastating eosinophilic disorders," says Ariel Munitz, PhD, a researcher at the department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology at the Sackler School of Medicine at Tel Aviv University and corresponding author of the study.

Eosinophils are regulated by interleukin 5 (IL-5), a protein that triggers eosinophils to leave the bone marrow and enter the bloodstream, where they can reach various organs. Dr. Munitz and Marc Rothenberg, MD, PhD, director of Allergy and Immunology at Cincinnati Children's, have identified a pathway for counterbalancing what happens when IL-5 triggers eosinophils. The newly identified pathway involves a key checkpoint controlled by a pair of proteins, PIR-A and PIR-B, which the researchers now show have a critical role in eosinophil development.

PIR-A induces eosinophils to die and thus is in a perpetual tug-of-war with survival and growth signals driven by IL-5. The researchers discovered that PIR-A is dominant in this battle but that cell death doesn't occur because PIR-B inhibits its actions. For PIR-A to win the battle and cause cells to die, PIR-B must be shut down.

The researchers studied asthmatic mice and discovered that asthmatic mice without PIR-B had little expansion of eosinophils in their blood and lungs and less asthmatic inflammation in their lungs than normal mice. The lack of PIR-B kept eosinophils from reaching harmful levels. The researchers hope that scientists can now target PIR-A to enhance its ability to kill eosinophils or weaken PIR-B so that it inhibits PIR-A to a lesser extent.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Netali Ben Baruch-Morgenstern, Dana Shik, Itay Moshkovits, Michal Itan, Danielle Karo-Atar, Carine Bouffi, Patricia C Fulkerson, Diana Rashkovan, Steffen Jung, Marc E Rothenberg, Ariel Munitz. Paired immunoglobulin-like receptor A is an intrinsic, self-limiting suppressor of IL-5–induced eosinophil development. Nature Immunology, 2013; DOI: 10.1038/ni.2757

Cite This Page:

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. "Discovery may lead to new treatments for allergic diseases." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131111102508.htm>.
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. (2013, November 11). Discovery may lead to new treatments for allergic diseases. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131111102508.htm
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. "Discovery may lead to new treatments for allergic diseases." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131111102508.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

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