Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

HIV can infect transplanted kidneys in HIV-positive recipients with undetectable virus

Date:
December 5, 2013
Source:
American Society of Nephrology (ASN)
Summary:
HIV infection occurred in 68% of the HIV-positive transplant recipients’ new kidneys even in the absence of any detectable HIV in their blood. A new urine test can detect these infections and lead to better diagnosis and treatment.

HIV can infect transplanted kidneys in HIV-positive recipients even in the absence of detectable virus in the blood, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). The study’s investigators also developed a simple urine test to diagnose such infections.

HIV is a common cause of kidney failure, and because of this, approximately 900 HIV-infected patients start dialysis each year in the United States. Kidney transplantation has recently become a therapeutic option for these patients, and the survival rate of HIV-infected transplant recipients with undetectable HIV in the blood is similar to that of non-HIV-infected transplant recipients. For unknown reasons, however, organ rejection is more common in HIV-infected transplant recipients.

To investigate this issue, Guillaume Canaud, MD, PhD (Necker Hospital, in Paris, France) and his colleagues assessed all 19 of HIV-positive patients in their center who received kidney transplants between June 1, 2006, and October 31, 2011. Genetic analyses demonstrated that HIV infection occurred in 68% of the HIV-positive recipients’ new organs even in the absence of any detectable HIV in their blood.

Biopsy experiments revealed two different forms of infection. In the first case, podocyte cells—which constitute the barrier through which blood is filtered in the kidneys—are the main target of HIV, and infection is associated with certain clinical signs of kidney dysfunction. In the second case, HIV infects tubular cells within the kidney, with fewer clinical manifestations.

The researchers also developed a new and simple urine test to detect HIV infection in the kidneys, which could be a promising non-invasive method for diagnosing problems in HIV-positive transplant recipients.

“This study is going to change the way of thinking of nephrologists and will certainly modify the approach of kidney transplantation in HIV patients, giving new hope to patients,” said Dr. Canaud.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. G. Canaud, N. Dejucq-Rainsford, V. Avettand-Fenoel, J.-P. Viard, D. Anglicheau, F. Bienaime, M. Muorah, L. Galmiche, O. Gribouval, L.-H. Noel, A.-P. Satie, F. Martinez, R. Sberro-Soussan, A. Scemla, M.-C. Gubler, G. Friedlander, C. Antignac, M.-O. Timsit, A. Onetti Muda, F. Terzi, C. Rouzioux, C. Legendre. The Kidney as a Reservoir for HIV-1 after Renal Transplantation. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 2013; DOI: 10.1681/ASN.2013050564
  2. P. G. Stock. Kidney Infection with HIV-1 Following Kidney Transplantation. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 2013; DOI: 10.1681/ASN.2013101112

Cite This Page:

American Society of Nephrology (ASN). "HIV can infect transplanted kidneys in HIV-positive recipients with undetectable virus." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 December 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131205185331.htm>.
American Society of Nephrology (ASN). (2013, December 5). HIV can infect transplanted kidneys in HIV-positive recipients with undetectable virus. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131205185331.htm
American Society of Nephrology (ASN). "HIV can infect transplanted kidneys in HIV-positive recipients with undetectable virus." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131205185331.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) California lawmakers pass a bill requiring universities to adopt "affirmative consent" language in their definitions of consensual sex, part of a nationwide drive to curb sexual assault on campuses. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Drug Could Reduce Cardiovascular Deaths

New Drug Could Reduce Cardiovascular Deaths

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) The new drug from Novartis could reduce cardiovascular deaths by 20 percent compared to other similar drugs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins