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Clues to how plants evolved to cope with cold

Date:
December 22, 2013
Source:
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)
Summary:
Researchers have found new clues to how plants evolved to withstand wintry weather. Scientists constructed an evolutionary tree of more than 32,000 species of flowering plants -- the largest time-scaled evolutionary tree to date. By combining their tree with freezing exposure records and leaf and stem data, the researchers were able to reconstruct how plants evolved to cope with cold as they spread across the globe.

These are deciduous maple leaves, recently senesced as winter approaches in Rock Creek Park, Washington, DC.
Credit: Photo by Amy Zanne

Researchers have found new clues to how plants evolved to withstand wintry weather. In a study to appear in the December 22 issue of the journal Nature, the team constructed an evolutionary tree of more than 32,000 species of flowering plants -- the largest time-scaled evolutionary tree to date. By combining their tree with freezing exposure records and leaf and stem data for thousands of species, the researchers were able to reconstruct how plants evolved to cope with cold as they spread across the globe. The results suggest that many plants acquired characteristics that helped them thrive in colder climates -- such as dying back to the roots in winter -- long before they first encountered freezing.

Fossil evidence and reconstructions of past climatic conditions suggest that early flowering plants lived in warm tropical environments, explained co-author Jeremy Beaulieu at the National Institute for Mathematical & Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) at the University of Tennessee.

As plants spread to higher latitudes and elevations, they evolved in ways that helped them deal with cold conditions. Plants that live in the tundra, such as Arctic cinquefoil and three-toothed saxifrage, can withstand winter temperatures below minus 15 degrees Celsius.

Unlike animals, most plants can't move to escape the cold or generate heat to keep them warm. It's not so much the cold but the ice that poses problems for plants. For instance, freezing and thawing cause air bubbles to form in the plant's internal water transport system.

"Think about the air bubbles you see suspended in the ice cubes," said co-author Amy Zanne of the George Washington University. "If enough of these air bubbles come together as water thaws they can block the flow of water from the roots to the leaves and kill the plant."

The researchers identified three traits that help plants get around these problems.

Some plants, such as hickories and oaks, avoid freezing damage by dropping their leaves before the winter chill sets in -- effectively shutting off the flow of water between roots and leaves -- and growing new leaves and water transport cells when warmer weather returns.

Other plants, such as birches and poplars, also protect themselves by having narrower water transport cells, which makes the parts of the plant that deliver water less susceptible to blockage during freezing and thawing.

Still others die back to the ground in winter and re-sprout from their roots, or start growing as new plants from seeds when conditions are right.

To compile the plant trait data for their study, the researchers spent hundreds of hours scouring and merging multiple large plant databases containing tens of thousands of species, largely with the support of the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center in North Carolina and Macquarie University in Australia.

When they mapped their collected leaf and stem data onto their evolutionary tree for flowering plants, they found that many plants were well equipped for icy climates even before cold conditions hit.

Plants that die back to the ground in winter, for example, acquired the ability to die and come back when conditions improve long before they first experienced freezing. Similarly, species with narrow water transport cells acquired a finer circulatory system well before they confronted cold climates.

"This suggests that some other environmental pressure -- possibly drought -- caused these plants to evolve this way, and it happened to work really well for freezing tolerance too," said Zanne.

The only exceptions were plants that shed and replace their leaves seasonally -- these plant groups didn't gain the ability to drop their leaves during winter until after they encountered freezing, Beaulieu added.

As a next step, the researchers plan to use their evolutionary tree to find out how plants evolved to withstand other environmental stresses in addition to freezing, such as drought and heat.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Amy E. Zanne, David C. Tank, William K. Cornwell, Jonathan M. Eastman, Stephen A. Smith, Richard G. FitzJohn, Daniel J. McGlinn, Brian C. O’Meara, Angela T. Moles, Peter B. Reich, Dana L. Royer, Douglas E. Soltis, Peter F. Stevens, Mark Westoby, Ian J. Wright, Lonnie Aarssen, Robert I. Bertin, Andre Calaminus, Rafaλl Govaerts, Frank Hemmings, Michelle R. Leishman, Jacek Oleksyn, Pamela S. Soltis, Nathan G. Swenson, Laura Warman, Jeremy M. Beaulieu. Three keys to the radiation of angiosperms into freezing environments. Nature, 2013; DOI: 10.1038/nature12872

Cite This Page:

National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent). "Clues to how plants evolved to cope with cold." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 December 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131222161805.htm>.
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent). (2013, December 22). Clues to how plants evolved to cope with cold. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131222161805.htm
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent). "Clues to how plants evolved to cope with cold." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131222161805.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

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