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Quinoa well tolerated in patients with celiac disease

Date:
January 21, 2014
Source:
American College of Gastroenterology (ACG)
Summary:
Adding quinoa to the gluten-free diet of patients with celiac disease is well-tolerated, and does not exacerbate the condition, according to new research.

Uncooked quinoa. Quinoa, a highly nutritious grain, is traditionally recommended as part of a gluten-free diet.
Credit: uckyo / Fotolia

Adding quinoa to the gluten-free diet of patients with celiac disease is well-tolerated, and does not exacerbate the condition, according to new research published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology. Dr. Victor F. Zevallos, from the Department of Gastroenterology, King's College London, United Kingdom, evaluated the in-vivo effects of consuming quinoa in adult celiac patients. Quinoa, a highly nutritious grain, is traditionally recommended as part of a gluten-free diet. However, in-vitro data suggests that quinoa storage proteins can stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses in celiac patients.

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Celiac disease is an immune-based reaction to dietary gluten (storage protein for wheat, barley and rye) that primarily affects the small intestine in those with a genetic predisposition and resolves with exclusion of gluten from the diet.

"The clinical data suggests that daily consumption of quinoa (50 grams) can be safely tolerated by celiac patients," said Dr. Zevallos. "Median values for all the patients' blood tests remained within normal ranges, and triglycerides and both low and high density lipoproteins decreased. We also found a positive trend towards improved small intestine morphology, particular a mild hypocholesterolemic (very low cholesterol) effect. It's important to note that further studies are needed to determine the long-term effects of quinoa consumptions in people with celiac disease."

The study tracked nineteen celiac patients as they consumed 50 grams of quinoa every day for six weeks as part of their gluten-free diet. Participants were free to choose the cooking method for the quinoa. Dr. Zevallos and researchers evaluated diet, serology and gastrointerestinal parameters, as well are detailed histological assessments of ten of the patients before and after consuming quinoa. Full blood count, liver, and renal profile were used to follow the health status of all the patients. Iron, vitamin B12, serum folate and lipid profile were also used to determine any effects of quinoa on the patients' gluten-free diet.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American College of Gastroenterology (ACG). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Victor F Zevallos, L Irene Herencia, Fuju Chang, Suzanne Donnelly, H Julia Ellis, Paul J Ciclitira. Gastrointestinal Effects of Eating Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) in Celiac Patients. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 2014; DOI: 10.1038/ajg.2013.431

Cite This Page:

American College of Gastroenterology (ACG). "Quinoa well tolerated in patients with celiac disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140121092743.htm>.
American College of Gastroenterology (ACG). (2014, January 21). Quinoa well tolerated in patients with celiac disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140121092743.htm
American College of Gastroenterology (ACG). "Quinoa well tolerated in patients with celiac disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140121092743.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

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