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Cars, computers, TVs spark obesity in developing countries

Date:
February 10, 2014
Source:
Simon Fraser University
Summary:
The spread of obesity and Type 2 diabetes could become epidemic in low-income countries, as more individuals are able to own higher priced items such as TVs, computers and cars.

Cars in India. The spread of obesity and type-2 diabetes could become epidemic in low-income countries, as more individuals are able to own higher priced items such as TVs, computers and cars.
Credit: © Galyna Andrushko / Fotolia

The spread of obesity and type-2 diabetes could become epidemic in low-income countries, as more individuals are able to own higher priced items such as TVs, computers and cars. The findings of an international study, led by Simon Fraser University health sciences professor Scott Lear, are published today in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

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Lear headed an international research team that analyzed data on more than 150,000 adults from 17 countries, ranging from high and middle income to low-income nations.

Researchers, who questioned participants about ownership as well as physical activity and diet, found a 400 percent increase in obesity and a 250 percent increase in diabetes among owners of these items in low-income countries.

The study also showed that owning all three devices was associated with a 31 percent decrease in physical activity, 21 percent increase in sitting and a 9 cm increase in waist size compared with those who owned no devices.

Comparatively, researchers found no association in high-income countries, suggesting that the effects of owning items linked to sedimentary lifestyles has already occurred, and is reflected in current high rates of these conditions.

"With increasing uptake of modern-day conveniences-TVs, cars, computers-low- and middle-income countries could see the same obesity and diabetes rates as in high-income countries that are the result of too much sitting, less physical activity and increased consumption of calories," says Lear, who also holds the SFU Pfizer/Heart & Stroke Foundation Chair in Cardiovascular Prevention Research at St. Paul's Hospital.

The results can lead to "potentially devastating societal health care consequences" in these countries, Lear adds. Rates of increase of obesity and diabetes are expected to rise as low- and middle-income countries develop and become more industrialized.

Lear is a principal investigator in another ongoing obesity study focusing on 4,000 children in Canada and India. He is also leading studies on internet-based chronic illness management, and supervising an SFU doctoral study on improving the heart health of South Asian women.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Simon Fraser University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Scott A. Lear, Koon Teo, Danijela Gasevic, Xiaohe Zhang, Paul P. Poirier, Sumathy Rangarajan, Pamela Seron, Roya Kelishadi, Azmi Mohd Tamil, Annamarie Kruger, Romaina Iqbal, Hani Swidan, Diego Gσmez-Arbelαez, Rita Yusuf, Jephat Chifamba, V. Raman Kutty, Kubilay Karsidag, Rajesh Kumar, Wei Li, Andrzej Szuba, Alvaro Avezum, Rafael Diaz, Sonia S. Anand, Annika Rosengren, Salim Yusuf. The association between ownership of common household devices and obesity and diabetes in high, middle and low income countries. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 2014 DOI: 10.1503/cmaj.131090

Cite This Page:

Simon Fraser University. "Cars, computers, TVs spark obesity in developing countries." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140210141954.htm>.
Simon Fraser University. (2014, February 10). Cars, computers, TVs spark obesity in developing countries. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140210141954.htm
Simon Fraser University. "Cars, computers, TVs spark obesity in developing countries." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140210141954.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

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