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Potentially revolutionary material: Scientists produce a novel form of artificial graphene

Date:
February 14, 2014
Source:
Université du Luxembourg
Summary:
A new breed of ultra thin super-material has the potential to cause a technological revolution. “Artificial graphene” should lead to faster, smaller and lighter electronic and optical devices of all kinds, including higher performance photovoltaic cells, lasers or LED lighting.
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Artificial graphene.
Credit: Image courtesy of Université du Luxembourg

A new breed of ultra thin super-material has the potential to cause a technological revolution. "Artificial graphene" should lead to faster, smaller and lighter electronic and optical devices of all kinds, including higher performance photovoltaic cells, lasers or LED lighting. For the first time, scientists are able to produce and have analysed artificial graphene from traditional semiconductor materials.

These findings were published recently in Physical Review X. A researcher from the University of Luxembourg played an important role in this highly innovative work.

Graphene (derived from graphite) is a one atom thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms. This strong, flexible, conducting and transparent material has huge scientific and technological potential. Only discovered in 2004, there is a major global push to understand its potential uses. Artificial graphene has the same honeycomb structure, but in this case, instead of carbon atoms, nanometer-thick semiconductor crystals are used. Changing the size, shape and chemical nature of the nano-crystals, makes it possible to tailor the material to each specific task.

The University of Luxembourg is heavily involved in cross-border, multidisciplinary research projects. In this case it partnered with the Institute for Electronics, Microelectronics, and Nanotechnology (IEMN) in Lille, France, the Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science and the Institute for Theoretical Physics of the University of Utrecht, Netherlands and the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden, Germany.

University of Luxembourg researcher Dr. Efterpi Kalesaki is the first author of the article appearing in the Physical Review X . Dr. Kalesaki said: "these self‐assembled semi-conducting nano-crystals with a honeycomb structure are emerging as a new class of systems with great potential." Prof Ludger Wirtz, head of the Theoretical Solid-State Physics group at the University of Luxembourg, added: "artificial graphene opens the door to a wide variety of materials with variable nano‐geometry and 'tunable' properties."


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Université du Luxembourg. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. E. Kalesaki, C. Delerue, C. Morais Smith, W. Beugeling, G. Allan, D. Vanmaekelbergh. Dirac Cones, Topological Edge States, and Nontrivial Flat Bands in Two-Dimensional Semiconductors with a Honeycomb Nanogeometry. Physical Review X, 2014; 4 (1) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevX.4.011010

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Université du Luxembourg. "Potentially revolutionary material: Scientists produce a novel form of artificial graphene." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140214075441.htm>.
Université du Luxembourg. (2014, February 14). Potentially revolutionary material: Scientists produce a novel form of artificial graphene. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140214075441.htm
Université du Luxembourg. "Potentially revolutionary material: Scientists produce a novel form of artificial graphene." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140214075441.htm (accessed July 1, 2015).

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