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Social norms strongly influence vaccination decisions, the spread of disease

Date:
February 14, 2014
Source:
University of Waterloo
Summary:
Our response to societal pressures about vaccination has a direct effect on the spread of pediatric infectious diseases in areas where inoculation is not mandatory, says research. By incorporating social norms into predictive modelling, a research team found that they can foresee the observed patterns of population behavior and disease spread during vaccine scares-times when anti-vaccine sentiment is strong.

Our response to societal pressures about vaccination has a direct effect on the spread of pediatric infectious diseases in areas where inoculation is not mandatory, says new research published this week in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

By incorporating social norms into predictive mathematical modelling, a research team from the University of Guelph and the University of Waterloo found that they can foresee the observed patterns of population behavior and disease spread during vaccine scares -- times when anti-vaccine sentiment is strong.

"If vaccination is not mandatory and disease is rare, then a few parents will be tempted to stop vaccinating their children," said Professor Chris Bauch of Waterloo's Faculty of Mathematics, and one of the study authors. "More parents adopt this behavior as social norms begin to change and it becomes increasingly acceptable to avoid some vaccines. Obviously, when enough parents are no longer vaccinating, the disease will come back."

In most of North America, pediatric vaccination is mandatory for children enrolled in public education. However, the number of parents applying for exemptions to pediatric vaccination is on the rise. According to Professor Bauch, as that trend continues Canadians will increasingly find themselves in a situation where vaccination coverage has declined and populations are once again susceptible to disease.

"Parents are not cold, clinical rationalists who base their decisions only on data. They are strongly influenced by other parents and what they read," said Professor Bauch. "Our research suggests that health officials needs to have a really good understanding of the social context to better understand vaccine scares and why people refuse vaccines. To do that, we have to develop predictive tools that also reflect social behavior patterns, or we won't be able to accurately represent what is happening during vaccine scares."

Predictive modelling can help public health officials plan for responses to vaccine programs. The models that Professor Bauch and his colleagues use can determine what may happen in a population where a vaccine scare has taken hold.

"If you've seen a big drop in vaccine coverage and you've seen a surge of disease because of that, you can use these models to predict how long it will take vaccine coverage to recover," said Professor Bauch.

Professor Bauch and his colleagues will continue to study how social norms interact with disease spread. Down the road, he hopes to use this model to create an index, which may be able to help determine which populations are more susceptible to vaccine scares, with the hope of preventing them from occurring.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Waterloo. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. T. Oraby, V. Thampi, C. T. Bauch. The influence of social norms on the dynamics of vaccinating behaviour for paediatric infectious diseases. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 2014; 281 (1780): 20133172 DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2013.3172

Cite This Page:

University of Waterloo. "Social norms strongly influence vaccination decisions, the spread of disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140214111211.htm>.
University of Waterloo. (2014, February 14). Social norms strongly influence vaccination decisions, the spread of disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140214111211.htm
University of Waterloo. "Social norms strongly influence vaccination decisions, the spread of disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140214111211.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

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