Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Novel assay developed for detecting ALK rearrangement in lung cancer

Date:
February 24, 2014
Source:
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
Summary:
A novel technique for detecting ALK rearrangements in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) has been developed that is more sensitive and easier to perform than currently available techniques. The technique can help enhance the routine practice of diagnostic ALK testing on NSCLCs, which is crucial for identifying patients with advanced NSCLC who are most likely to benefit from targeted therapy with an ALK inhibitor.

Researchers have developed a novel technique for detecting ALK rearrangements in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) that is more sensitive and easier to perform than currently available techniques. The technique can help enhance the routine practice of diagnostic ALK testing on NSCLCs, which is crucial for identifying patients with advanced NSCLC who are most likely to benefit from targeted therapy with an ALK inhibitor.

Related Articles


None of the current three routine methods used to detect ALK rearrangements in NSCLC is without drawbacks, especially for tissue specimens that are fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is the only approved technique for ALK testing, but it is not always feasible because of high cost, the time required for testing, and the need for specialized equipment and expertise. Interpretation of immunohistochemistry (IHC) results can be challenging because of weak and variable immunoreactivity. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is highly sensitive, but requires high-quality RNA, which is often difficult to obtain, and cannot detect rearrangements with unknown partners.

The novel technique, based on quantitative (q)RT-PCR, overcomes these issues by capitalizing on the sensitivity of RT-PCR and including two features: an RNA isolation method that was optimized to reverse formaldehyde modification and small RT-PCR amplicons to allow for the use of fragmented nucleic acids for efficient amplification of ALK cDNA. The novel qRT-PCR test measures the expression of the 5' and the 3' portions of the ALK transcript separately; it detected unbalanced ALK expression indicative of a gene rearrangement in 24 (4.6%) of 523 interpretable NSCLC specimens and full-length ALK transcript expression in six tumors (1.1%). Both FISH and qRT-PCR testing were done on 182 tumors; qRT-PCR accurately typed 97% of 19 tumors with ALK rearrangements and 158 with no rearrangements. The findings of the study are published in the March issue of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology (JTO), the official journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC).

"The qRT-PCR technique reliably detects ALK-rearranged tumors independently of the fusion partner and also identifies tumors with full-length transcript expression of the gene that is not detectable by FISH but may be relevant for ALK inhibitor therapy as well," says lead author Claudia Kalla, PhD, of the Department of Clinical Pathology, Robert-Bosch-Krankenhaus and theDr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Stuttgart, Germany. "The technique seems to be a sensitive, easy-to-perform, and high-throughput method suitable for the routine diagnosis of ALK activation not only in lung cancer, but also in other tumor entities where rearrangements with alternative fusion partners or transcriptional upregulation are prevalent."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kim Gruber, Heike Horn, Jörg Kalla, Peter Fritz, Andreas Rosenwald, Martin Kohlhäufl, Godehard Friedel, Matthias Schwab, German Ott, Claudia Kalla. Detection of Rearrangements and Transcriptional Up-Regulation of ALK in FFPE Lung Cancer Specimens Using a Novel, Sensitive, Quantitative Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay. Journal of Thoracic Oncology, 2014; 9 (3): 307 DOI: 10.1097/JTO.0000000000000068

Cite This Page:

International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. "Novel assay developed for detecting ALK rearrangement in lung cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140224124121.htm>.
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. (2014, February 24). Novel assay developed for detecting ALK rearrangement in lung cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140224124121.htm
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. "Novel assay developed for detecting ALK rearrangement in lung cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140224124121.htm (accessed December 20, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) — It's hard to resist those delicious but fattening carbs we all crave during the winter months, but there are some ways to stay satisfied without consuming the extra calories. Vanessa Freeman (@VanessaFreeTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) — More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) — In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) — The new year is coming and nothing will energize you more for 2015 than protein-filled foods. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) gives his favorite high protein foods that will help you build muscle, lose fat and have endless energy. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins