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Doggy agility: are emotions thwarting performance?

Date:
March 4, 2014
Source:
Taylor & Francis
Summary:
With Crufts fast approaching, and canine agility in the spotlight, researchers ask if right and left-sided brain function and stimuli affect canine performance. There is a long established and debated human right brain/left brain theory: does lateralization of brain function affect dogs too? Their study reveals fascinating insights into workings of the canine brain.
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With Crufts fast approaching, and canine agility in the spotlight, researchers in Laterality ask if right and left-sided brain function and stimuli affect canine performance. There is a long established and debated human right brain/left brain theory: does lateralisation of brain function affect dogs too? Their study reveals fascinating insights into workings of the canine brain.

Researchers used 17 dogs and trainers to conduct a series of tests, firstly paw preference tests whilst offering food and also agility tests, using A-frames, jumps and weave poles. Throughout, the dogs received trainer stimuli from both right and left sides. Trainers also completed questionnaires giving more information about the dog's temperament.

Results of the three combined revealed intriguing relationships between paw preference and agility. Dogs with stronger paw preferences seemed more predisposed to training, less distracted and had greater agility. When trainers presented on the left, dogs were more agitated, emotional, and performances deteriorated. A dog's left visual field stimulates right brain hemisphere.

So, what causes the uneven response to right and left stimuli? Could the asymmetry be due to separate triggers in right/left hemispheres: a dichotomy in function? Does the right side of a canine brain control doggy intense emotions?


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Taylor & Francis. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Marcello Siniscalchi, Daniele Bertino, Angelo Quaranta. Laterality and performance of agility-trained dogs. Laterality: Asymmetries of Body, Brain and Cognition, 2014; 19 (2): 219 DOI: 10.1080/1357650X.2013.794815

Cite This Page:

Taylor & Francis. "Doggy agility: are emotions thwarting performance?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140304113223.htm>.
Taylor & Francis. (2014, March 4). Doggy agility: are emotions thwarting performance?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140304113223.htm
Taylor & Francis. "Doggy agility: are emotions thwarting performance?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140304113223.htm (accessed August 27, 2015).

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