Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Doggy agility: are emotions thwarting performance?

Date:
March 4, 2014
Source:
Taylor & Francis
Summary:
With Crufts fast approaching, and canine agility in the spotlight, researchers ask if right and left-sided brain function and stimuli affect canine performance.There is a long established and debated human right brain/left brain theory: does lateralization of brain function affect dogs too?Their study reveals fascinating insights into workings of the canine brain.

With Crufts fast approaching, and canine agility in the spotlight, researchers in Laterality ask if right and left-sided brain function and stimuli affect canine performance. There is a long established and debated human right brain/left brain theory: does lateralisation of brain function affect dogs too? Their study reveals fascinating insights into workings of the canine brain.

Related Articles


Researchers used 17 dogs and trainers to conduct a series of tests, firstly paw preference tests whilst offering food and also agility tests, using A-frames, jumps and weave poles. Throughout, the dogs received trainer stimuli from both right and left sides. Trainers also completed questionnaires giving more information about the dog's temperament.

Results of the three combined revealed intriguing relationships between paw preference and agility. Dogs with stronger paw preferences seemed more predisposed to training, less distracted and had greater agility. When trainers presented on the left, dogs were more agitated, emotional, and performances deteriorated. A dog's left visual field stimulates right brain hemisphere.

So, what causes the uneven response to right and left stimuli? Could the asymmetry be due to separate triggers in right/left hemispheres: a dichotomy in function? Does the right side of a canine brain control doggy intense emotions?


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Taylor & Francis. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Marcello Siniscalchi, Daniele Bertino, Angelo Quaranta. Laterality and performance of agility-trained dogs. Laterality: Asymmetries of Body, Brain and Cognition, 2014; 19 (2): 219 DOI: 10.1080/1357650X.2013.794815

Cite This Page:

Taylor & Francis. "Doggy agility: are emotions thwarting performance?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140304113223.htm>.
Taylor & Francis. (2014, March 4). Doggy agility: are emotions thwarting performance?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140304113223.htm
Taylor & Francis. "Doggy agility: are emotions thwarting performance?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140304113223.htm (accessed November 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Friday, November 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Baby Okapi Born at Houston Zoo

Raw: Baby Okapi Born at Houston Zoo

AP (Nov. 20, 2014) The Houston Zoo released video of a male baby okapi. Okapis, also known as the "forest giraffe", are native to the Democratic Republic of the Congo in Central Africa. Video is mute from source. (Nov. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Your Complicated Job Might Keep Your Brain Young

Your Complicated Job Might Keep Your Brain Young

Newsy (Nov. 20, 2014) Researchers at the University of Edinburgh found the more complex your job is, the sharper your cognitive skills will likely be as you age. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mysterious Glow Worms Found in the Amazon

Mysterious Glow Worms Found in the Amazon

Buzz60 (Nov. 20, 2014) Wildlife photographer Jeff Cremer teamed up with entomologist Aaron Pomerantz and others to investigate a predatory glow worm found in the Amazon. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins