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New cell line should accelerate embryonic stem cell research

Date:
March 14, 2014
Source:
University of Washington - Health Sciences/UW News, Community Relations & Marketing
Summary:
A new line of human embryonic stem cells that have the ability to develop into a far broader range of tissues than most existing cell lines has been created by researchers. The cells, called nave embryonic stem cells, normally appear at the earliest stages of embryonic development. They retain the ability to turn into any of all the different types of cells of the human body -- a capacity called "pluripotency."

Dr. Carol Ware at work in her laboratory at the Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine
Credit: Brian Donohue

University of Washington researchers have created a line of human embryonic stem cells with the ability to develop into a far broader range of tissues than most existing cell lines.

"These cells will allow us to gain a much greater understanding of normal embryonic development and have the real potential for use in developing ways to grow new tissues and organs for transplantation," said Carol Ware, a professor of comparative medicine. She is the lead author of a paper describing the new cell line.

The findings are reported in the March 10 issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The cells, called nave embryonic stem cells, normally appear at the earliest stages of embryonic development. They retain the ability to turn into any of all the different types of cells of the human body -- a capacity called "pluripotency."

Researchers had been able to develop nave cells using mouse embryonic stem cells, but to create naive human embryonic stem cells has required inserting a set of genes that force the cells to behave like naive cells.

While these transgenic cells are valuable research tools, the presence of artificially introduced genes meant the cells will not develop as normal embryonic cells would nor could they be safely used to create tissues and organs for transplantation.

In an article, Ware and her colleagues from the UW Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine describe how they successfully created a line of nave human embryonic stem cells without introducing an artificial set of genes.

They first took embryonic stem cells that are slightly more developed, called primed stem cells, and grew them in a medium that contained factors that switched them back -- or "reverse toggled" them -- to the nave state. They then used the reverse toggled cells to develop a culture medium that would keep them in the nave state and create a stable cell line for study and research.

While the "reverse toggled" cells are much easier to create and will prove valuable research tools, Ware said, the cells that were directly derived from embryos are the more important advance because they are more likely to behave, grow and develop as embryonic cells do in nature.

The new cell line is called Elf1: "El" for the Ellison Foundation, a major supporter of the lab's work; "f" for female, the sex of the stem cell; and "1" for first.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Washington - Health Sciences/UW News, Community Relations & Marketing. The original article was written by Michael McCarthy. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. C. B. Ware, A. M. Nelson, B. Mecham, J. Hesson, W. Zhou, E. C. Jonlin, A. J. Jimenez-Caliani, X. Deng, C. Cavanaugh, S. Cook, P. J. Tesar, J. Okada, L. Margaretha, H. Sperber, M. Choi, C. A. Blau, P. M. Treuting, R. D. Hawkins, V. Cirulli, H. Ruohola-Baker. Derivation of naive human embryonic stem cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2014; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1319738111

Cite This Page:

University of Washington - Health Sciences/UW News, Community Relations & Marketing. "New cell line should accelerate embryonic stem cell research." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140314095104.htm>.
University of Washington - Health Sciences/UW News, Community Relations & Marketing. (2014, March 14). New cell line should accelerate embryonic stem cell research. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140314095104.htm
University of Washington - Health Sciences/UW News, Community Relations & Marketing. "New cell line should accelerate embryonic stem cell research." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140314095104.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

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