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Supplements not associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease in elderly

Date:
March 18, 2014
Source:
The JAMA Network Journals
Summary:
Daily dietary supplements of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (also found in fish) or lutein and zeaxanthin (nutrients found in green leafy vegetables) were not associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease in elderly patients with the eye disease age-related macular degeneration.
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Daily dietary supplements of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (also found in fish) or lutein and zeaxanthin (nutrients found in green leafy vegetables) were not associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in elderly patients with the eye disease age-related macular degeneration.

Diet studies have suggested that increased intake of fish, a source of omega (ω)-3 fatty acids, can reduce rates of cardiac death, death from all other causes and heart attack. However, the evidence that taking dietary supplements containing those fatty acids has been inconsistent and has suggested no reduction in CVD events. Data on the impact of lutein and zeaxanthin (two dietary xanthophylls found in the macula of the human eye) on CVD are not as substantial.

Cardiovascular outcomes were studied as part of AREDS2, a clinical trial of supplements and their impact on age-related macular degeneration. As part of the cardiovascular outcomes ancillary study, 4,203 individuals were randomized to take: supplements containing the ω-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid [DHA] and eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] (n=1,068); the macular xanthophylls lutein and zeaxanthin (n=1,044); a combination of the two (n=1,079); or placebo (1,012). The supplements were added to vitamins and minerals recommended for macular degeneration and given to the participants, who were primarily white, married and highly educated with a median age of 74 years at baseline.

There was no reduction in CVD (heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular death) or secondary CVD outcomes (hospitalized heart failure, revascularization or unstable angina) among patients taking the supplements.

"We found no significant benefit among older individuals treated with either ω-3 supplements or with a combination of lutein plus zeaxanthin. Our results are consistent with a growing body of evidence from clinical trials that have found little CVD benefit from moderate levels of dietary supplementation," the authors concluded.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The JAMA Network Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Denise E. Bonds, Molly Harrington, Bradford B. Worrall, Alain G. Bertoni, Charles B. Eaton, Judy Hsia, Jennifer Robinson, Traci E. Clemons, Lawrence J. Fine, Emily Y. Chew. Effect of Long-Chain ω-3 Fatty Acids and Lutein   Zeaxanthin Supplements on Cardiovascular Outcomes. JAMA Internal Medicine, 2014; DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.328

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The JAMA Network Journals. "Supplements not associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease in elderly." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140318093914.htm>.
The JAMA Network Journals. (2014, March 18). Supplements not associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease in elderly. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140318093914.htm
The JAMA Network Journals. "Supplements not associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease in elderly." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140318093914.htm (accessed May 26, 2015).

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