Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Lack of energy at the basis of Parkinson's disease

Date:
March 20, 2014
Source:
VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)
Summary:
A defect in the gene Pink1 results in Parkinson's disease, neuroscientists have demonstrated. By mapping this process at a molecular level, they have provided the ultimate proof that a deficient energy production process in cells can result in Parkinson's disease.

Vanessa Moraïs. Neuroscientists Vanessa Moraïs and Bart De Strooper from VIB and KU Leuven have demonstrated how a defect in the gene Pink1 results in Parkinson's disease.
Credit: (c) VIB

Neuroscientists Vanessa Moraïs and Bart De Strooper from VIB and KU Leuven have demonstrated how a defect in the gene Pink1 results in Parkinson's disease. By mapping this process at a molecular level, they have provided the ultimate proof that a deficient energy production process in cells can result in Parkinson's disease. These insights are so revolutionary that they have been published in the leading journal Science.

Vanessa Moraïs (VIB/KU Leuven): "Having Parkinson's disease means that you can no longer tell your own body what to do. The hope of finding a solution to this has stimulated me for many years to unravel what goes wrong in the cells of Parkinson's patients. This research is an important step forwards."

Bart De Strooper (VIB/KU Leuven): "Parkinson's disease is one of the research focuses in our department. It gives great satisfaction that we have unraveled a molecular process responsible for the faulty energy production process in cells of Parkinson's patients. This confirms our belief that repairing the energy production in cells is a possible therapeutic strategy."

Faulty energy production forms the basis of Parkinson's disease.

Mitochondria are cell components that produce the energy required by a cell to function. The action of these mitochondria -- and therefore the energy production in cells -- is disrupted in Parkinson's disease. The exact mechanism was unknown. In recent years, scientists have described various gene defects (mutations) in Parkinson's patients that result in decreased activity of the mitochondria, including a mutation in the Pink1 gene.

Molecular mechanism provides ultimate proof

Vanessa Moraïs studied the link between Pink1, mitochondria and Parkinson's disease in fruit-flies and mice with a defective Pink1 gene. These model organisms exhibited symptoms of Parkinson's disease as a result of this defect. She was able to demonstrate that the defect in Pink1 resulted in the so-called 'Complex I' -- a protein complex with a crucial role in the energy production of mitochondria -- not being phosphorylated adequately, resulting in decreased energy production. When Moraïs and her colleagues ensured correct phosphorylation of Complex I, the Parkinson's symptoms decreased or disappeared in mice and in patient-derived stem cell lines. The scientists thereby demonstrated that the lack of phosphorylation causes Parkinson's disease in patients with a defect Pin1 gene.

Further research in Parkinson's patients with defective Pink1 gene

This study reveals that repairing the phosphorylation of Complex I could be a treatment strategy for Parkinson's disease. The VIB scientists have already used cells from Parkinson's patients with a defective Pink1 gene to demonstrate that repairing the phosphorylation results in increased energy production. However, will this cause the symptoms of Parkinson's disease to decrease or disappear? Only tests on patients can answer this question. According to the scientists, the best strategy would be to start with the sub-group of patients with a defective Pink1 gene. But before starting clinical trials, a lot of aspects still have to be tested.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. V. A. Morais, D. Haddad, K. Craessaerts, P.-J. De Bock, J. Swerts, S. Vilain, L. Aerts, L. Overbergh, A. Grunewald, P. Seibler, C. Klein, K. Gevaert, P. Verstreken, B. De Strooper. PINK1 Loss of Function Mutations Affect Mitochondrial Complex I Activity via NdufA10 Ubiquinone Uncoupling. Science, 2014; DOI: 10.1126/science.1249161

Cite This Page:

VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology). "Lack of energy at the basis of Parkinson's disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140320173514.htm>.
VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology). (2014, March 20). Lack of energy at the basis of Parkinson's disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140320173514.htm
VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology). "Lack of energy at the basis of Parkinson's disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140320173514.htm (accessed July 30, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

Concern Grows Over Worsening Ebola Crisis

AFP (July 30, 2014) — Pan-African airline ASKY has suspended all flights to and from the capitals of Liberia and Sierra Leone amid the worsening Ebola health crisis, which has so far caused 672 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Duration: 00:43 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) — Pfizer, the world's largest drug maker, cut full-year revenue forecasts because generics could cut into sales of its anti-arthritis drug, Celebrex. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) — Nigerian authorities have shut and quarantined a Lagos hospital where a Liberian man died of the Ebola virus, the first recorded case of the highly-infectious disease in Africa's most populous economy. David Pollard reports Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Newsy (July 29, 2014) — According to a new study, just five minutes of running or jogging a day could add years to your life. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins