Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Synthetic collagen promotes natural clotting

Date:
April 9, 2014
Source:
Rice University
Summary:
Synthetic collagen may help wounds heal by directing the natural clotting of blood. The material, KOD, mimics natural collagen, a fibrous protein that binds cells together into organs and tissues. It could improve upon commercial sponges or therapies based on naturally derived porcine or bovine-derived collagen now used to aid healing during or after surgery.

Synthetic collagen invented at Rice University may help wounds heal by directing the natural clotting of blood.

The material, KOD, mimics natural collagen, a fibrous protein that binds cells together into organs and tissues. It could improve upon commercial sponges or therapies based on naturally derived porcine or bovine-derived collagen now used to aid healing during or after surgery.

The lab of Jeffrey Hartgerink, a chemist and bioengineer based at Rice's BioScience Research Collaborative, developed synthetic collagen several years ago. The lab's analysis of KOD for use as a hemostat, or clotting agent, appears this month in the American Chemical Society journal Biomacromolecules.

Hartgerink and lead author Vivek Kumar, a postdoctoral researcher at Rice, viewed clotting as a good avenue of investigation for practical application of KOD, a synthetic protein made of 36 amino acids that self-assemble into triple-helix nanofibers and hydrogels.

"We showed we can make small peptides that we can easily synthesize chemically, which means we can purify them for a completely homogeneous material," Hartgerink said. "Those peptides self-assemble into fibers that in turn become a hydrogel. This hierarchy of assembly -- from a peptide to a triple helix to a fiber to a hydrogel -- mimics much of the hierarchy of assembly of natural collagen."

Hartgerink said collagen's importance goes beyond its role as a scaffold for cells. "How a cell determines what it's going to do depends in large part on the chemical surface it's attached to," he said.

"We've been thinking about KOD for hemostasis for a long time. Natural collagen is already used in a variety of on-the-market products for hemostasis, but there are benefits to a synthetic system. We can avoid the immune problems associated with using collagen from cows, for example. The ability to synthesize KOD chemically gives us a pure product."

Lab tests showed KOD hydrogel traps red blood cells to stop bleeding and, unlike commercial barriers, binds and activates platelets that form clots to promote healing. The tests also determined KOD does not promote inflammation.

"We wouldn't envision using KOD for major trauma, because there are conventional methods like tourniquets or using clay-based materials that are much more effective in that immediate situation," said Kumar, who often used his own blood to test the hydrogel against commercial hemostats. "We see using this for more specific, site-directed applications, like to stop surgical bleeding."

"This is not going to be a battlefield dressing or something a first responder is likely to use," Hartgerink said. "But when the goal is to promote delicate and natural healing where scarring is a concern, this can be more nuanced and effective."

While validation is needed for KOD to be used in operating rooms, the researchers are already considering applications for wound healing and graft support. "We have the flexibility to incorporate higher levels of complexity within our peptide matrix," Kumar said. "We can incorporate cell adhesion or degradation sites to recruit cells or draw in different components from native tissue."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Rice University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Vivek A. Kumar, Nichole L. Taylor, Abhishek A. Jalan, Lyahn K. Hwang, Benjamin K. Wang, Jeffery D. Hartgerink. A Nanostructured Synthetic Collagen Mimic for Hemostasis. Biomacromolecules, 2014; 140402114803006 DOI: 10.1021/bm500091e

Cite This Page:

Rice University. "Synthetic collagen promotes natural clotting." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140409134936.htm>.
Rice University. (2014, April 9). Synthetic collagen promotes natural clotting. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140409134936.htm
Rice University. "Synthetic collagen promotes natural clotting." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140409134936.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

AP (July 28, 2014) West African nations and international health organizations are working to contain the largest Ebola outbreak in history. It's one of the deadliest diseases known to man, but the CDC says it's unlikely to spread in the U.S. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

AP (July 28, 2014) A bipartisan deal to improve veterans health care would authorize at least $15 billion in emergency spending to fix a veterans program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Reuters - US Online Video (July 28, 2014) Two American aid workers in Liberia test positive for Ebola while working to combat the deadliest outbreak of the virus ever. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins