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Bioanalysis: Microbeads are easily fixed

Date:
April 10, 2014
Source:
The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR)
Summary:
A passive method for sorting and fixing microbeads of different sizes could lead to cheaper and more functional biological assays, researchers report. Biological assays are an integral part of the researcher's toolkit in the fields of biomolecular chemistry and genomics. Microfluidic microbead systems, which consist of arrays of beads coated with an assay-specific reagent, have revolutionized biological assay technology by allowing the high-throughput detection of target molecules from small sample volumes. Fabrication of the microbead systems, however, requires great care and various ancillary devices.

Microscopy image of a microtrap array showing the capture of large 16-micrometer-diameter beads in surface traps. Smaller 8-micrometer-diameter beads accumulate in the underlying dispersion gap.
Credit: Copyright : 2014 A*STAR Institute of Microelectronics

A passive method for sorting and fixing microbeads of different sizes could lead to cheaper and more functional biological assays

Biological assays are an integral part of the researcher's toolkit in the fields of biomolecular chemistry and genomics. Microfluidic microbead systems, which consist of arrays of beads coated with an assay-specific reagent, have revolutionized biological assay technology by allowing the high-throughput detection of target molecules from small sample volumes. Fabrication of the microbead systems, however, requires great care and various ancillary devices.

Chee Chung Wong and colleagues from the A*STAR Institute of Microelectronics have now developed a passive and robust method for manufacturing sorted arrays of multiple microbead types.

The preparation of microbead systems conventionally involves the use of a pump to introduce a bead-carrying fluid into a microfluidic circuit. The beads then adsorb to the walls of the microchannels with little control over position or sorting. The resultant microbead-coated channels can be used for targeted molecule detection, but the beads can be easily dislodged by flow.

Recognizing the limitations of conventional systems, Wong and his colleagues set out to develop a passive, pumpless method for preparing more robust microbead arrays. "There are no pumpless bead sorting strategies currently available," notes Wong. As a result, "we had to research and study three-dimensional trap architectures that could efficiently perform size-based bead sorting."

The researchers used semiconductor fabrication technologies to create a trap architecture consisting of a top surface with larger micrometer-sized holes and an underlying diffusion gap. When a drop of fluid containing microbeads is placed on the top surface, the beads become trapped in the micrometer-sized holes while the fluid is free to flow through the diffusion layer and out of the array. This structure has the advantage of allowing beads of different sizes to be trapped and permanently fixed in different parts of the device as the fluid evaporates (see image).

"We studied how a droplet of liquid evaporates and how this affects the flow field," says Wong. "Based on simulations and experiments, we were able to optimize our microtrap architecture for efficient size-based sorting of a range of different bead sizes."

The researchers expect their fabrication method to alleviate ease-of-use issues associated with current bead sorting assays, but also to significantly speed-up throughput by allowing multiple molecular targets to be detected in one device. "The additional dimension of bead size would directly increase the number of analytes that can be detected," says Wong. "They could increase from two, for a conventional two-color system, to six for a system with three bead sizes in different trap regions."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Chee Chung Wong, Yuxin Liu, Karen Yanping Wang, Abdur Rub Abdur Rahman. Size based sorting and patterning of microbeads by evaporation driven flow in a 3D micro-traps array. Lab on a Chip, 2013; 13 (18): 3663 DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50274K

Cite This Page:

The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). "Bioanalysis: Microbeads are easily fixed." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140410160243.htm>.
The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). (2014, April 10). Bioanalysis: Microbeads are easily fixed. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140410160243.htm
The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). "Bioanalysis: Microbeads are easily fixed." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140410160243.htm (accessed August 22, 2014).

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