Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New target for prostate cancer resistant to anti-hormone therapies

Date:
April 23, 2014
Source:
University of Michigan Health System
Summary:
A new target that could remain sensitive even when prostate cancer becomes resistant to current treatments has been discovered by researchers. Prostate cancer becomes deadly when anti-hormone treatments stop working. This new study suggests a way to block the hormones at their entrance.

Prostate cancer becomes deadly when anti-hormone treatments stop working. Now a new study suggests a way to block the hormones at their entrance.

Researchers from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have found that a protein called BET bromodomain protein 4 binds to the hormone androgen receptor downstream of where current therapies work -- targeting androgen receptor signaling.

This could mean that when prostate cancer becomes resistant to current treatments, it might remain sensitive to a drug that targets BET bromodomain proteins. Results appear in Nature.

"We think we can target prostate cancer through androgen receptor signaling, rather than directly hitting the androgen receptor. These initial findings suggest the potential that a BET bromodomain inhibitor can work even when prostate cancer becomes resistant to anti-hormone therapies," says senior study author Arul Chinnaiyan, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Michigan Center for Translational Pathology and S.P. Hicks Professor of Pathology at the University of Michigan Medical School.

The researchers used a compound called JQ1, designed to inhibit BET bromodomain proteins, to test the concept in cell lines and mice. They found that JQ1 blocked androgen signaling even when cells no longer responded to current anti-androgen therapies. The JQ1 BET bromodomain inhibitor blocked androgen receptor signaling, which is downstream of the androgen receptor, making it potentially unaffected by the acquired resistance related to hormone signaling.

The researchers also found that BET inhibitors appear to block several transcription factors, including the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion and MYC, known to drive prostate cancer.

Bromodomain inhibitors have been explored in blood cancers and a rare cancer called NUT midline carcinoma. This is one of the first indications that BET bromodomain inhibitors may be beneficial in a common solid tumor.

A newly formed company, OncoFusion Therapeutics, co-founded by Chinnaiyan and study co-author Shaomeng Wang, Ph.D., will look at developing potential BET bromodomain inhibitors to attack prostate cancer.

"BET bromodomain represents one of the most exciting targets in epigenetics," Chinnaiyan says. "Developing new ways to treat castration-resistant prostate cancer is critical to improving survival for this disease."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Michigan Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Irfan A. Asangani, Vijaya L. Dommeti, Xiaoju Wang, Rohit Malik, Marcin Cieslik, Rendong Yang, June Escara-Wilke, Kari Wilder-Romans, Sudheer Dhanireddy, Carl Engelke, Mathew K. Iyer, Xiaojun Jing, Yi-Mi Wu, Xuhong Cao, Zhaohui S. Qin, Shaomeng Wang, Felix Y. Feng, Arul M. Chinnaiyan. Therapeutic targeting of BET bromodomain proteins in castration-resistant prostate cancer. Nature, 2014; DOI: 10.1038/nature13229

Cite This Page:

University of Michigan Health System. "New target for prostate cancer resistant to anti-hormone therapies." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140423132423.htm>.
University of Michigan Health System. (2014, April 23). New target for prostate cancer resistant to anti-hormone therapies. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140423132423.htm
University of Michigan Health System. "New target for prostate cancer resistant to anti-hormone therapies." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140423132423.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) A Texas man is lucky to be alive after he and three others floated for more than a day in the Gulf of Mexico when their boat sank during a fishing trip. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

AFP (Sep. 16, 2014) Since the arrival of Ebola in Ivory Coast, Ivorians have been abandoning their pets, particularly monkeys, in the fear that they may transmit the virus. Duration: 00:47 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) New findings suggest men with a certain type of baldness at age 45 are 39 percent more likely to develop aggressive prostate cancer. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

      Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins