Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Risk of traffic accident injury depends on sex and age, Spanish study finds

Date:
April 24, 2014
Source:
Plataforma SINC
Summary:
Young men are more likely to injure themselves on the road or crossing a street than women, but among the elderly, females are more vulnerable. This is according to a study on injuries and citizen mobility. According to the researchers, the fact that the risk is greater in child pedestrians and young male drivers can be associated with their greater risk taking at the wheel and in the case of girls, when crossing the street, as well as the fact that they act recklessly more frequently, such as speeding and consuming psychoactive substances.

Young men are more likely to injure themselves on the road or crossing a street than women, but among the elderly females are more vulnerable. This is according to a study on injuries and citizen mobility undertaken by researchers from the Barcelona Public Health Agency.

The latest Daily Mobility Survey of Catalonia (EMQ 2006, Spain) has served as a reference for a team from the Barcelona Public Health Agency for comparing the risk of traffic accident injury between men and women. The data gathers the times and modes of transport of around 100,000 people and, according to the researchers, the conclusions can be extrapolated to other similar regions.

The results of the study, published this month in the journal 'Accident, Analysis and Prevention', reveal that, contrary to the general belief, men are not always at a greater risk of injuring themselves on the road or on the street than women; it depends on the age group and mode of transport.

"Among the youngest pedestrians and drivers, men show a greater risk of mild and serious injury than women, although the differences are reversed as age increases, such that elderly females are more likely to injure themselves than males," Elena Santamariña, one of the authors, explained to SINC.

According to the researchers, the fact that the risk is greater in child pedestrians and young male drivers can be associated with their greater risk taking at the wheel and in the case of girls, when crossing the street, as well as the fact that they act recklessly more frequently, such as speeding and consuming psychoactive substances.

At the other age extreme, the likelihood of injury of older female pedestrians and adult and elderly female drivers is higher due to factors such as less driving experience, which reduces their ability to avoid collisions and their perception of risk walking along a street, as well as greater physical fragility in accidents.

Women on city streets and men on intercity roads

"Moreover, women tend to drive more along city streets -- generally for journeys associated with the family and home -- where there is likely to be more congestion, increasing the probability of collision, although the accidents are less serious because the speed is lower," Santamariña added.

The researcher recognizes that the majority of these factors are related with gender roles and the masculine and feminine stereotypes established in society, "but not because there is an innate biological difference between the two sexes."

For the same reason, risky behaviors and a more aggressive attitude at the wheel are associated more with men, who also drive more and for longer on intercity roads, for work reasons. This makes them more exposed to serious collisions because of the greater speed of these roads.

In fact, the study confirms that the risk of fatal injury or death is always greater in men than women. Furthermore, regardless of the mode of transport, the number of age groups in which men present a higher risk than women and the size of these differences increase with the seriousness of the accident.

"All these factors demonstrate that at the time of estimating the risk of injury from traffic in men and women, rates specific to age must be calculated, according to the mode of transport and seriousness," emphasized Santamariña.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Plataforma SINC. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Elena Santamariña-Rubio, Katherine Pérez, Marta Olabarria, Ana M. Novoa. Gender differences in road traffic injury rate using time travelled as a measure of exposure. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 2014; 65: 1 DOI: 10.1016/j.aap.2013.11.015

Cite This Page:

Plataforma SINC. "Risk of traffic accident injury depends on sex and age, Spanish study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140424113000.htm>.
Plataforma SINC. (2014, April 24). Risk of traffic accident injury depends on sex and age, Spanish study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140424113000.htm
Plataforma SINC. "Risk of traffic accident injury depends on sex and age, Spanish study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140424113000.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Newsy (July 27, 2014) — A new study shows sleep deprivation can make it harder for people to remember specific details of an event. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
University Quiz Implies Atheists Are Smarter Than Christians

University Quiz Implies Atheists Are Smarter Than Christians

Newsy (July 25, 2014) — An online quiz from a required course at Ohio State is making waves for suggesting atheists are inherently smarter than Christians. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

AFP (July 24, 2014) — A so-called drugs rehab 'clinic' is closed down in Pakistan after police find scores of ‘patients’ chained up alleging serial abuse. Duration 03:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) — The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins