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Bioprinting 3-D liver-like device to detoxify blood

Date:
May 15, 2014
Source:
University of California - San Diego
Summary:
Nanoengineers have developed a 3D-printed device inspired by the liver to remove dangerous toxins from the blood. The device, which is designed to be used outside the body -- much like dialysis -- uses nanoparticles to trap pore-forming toxins that can damage cellular membranes and are a key factor in illnesses that result from animal bites and stings, and bacterial infections.

Nanoengineers have developed a 3D printed device inspired by the liver to remove dangerous toxins from the blood. The device, which is designed to be used outside the body like dialysis, uses nanoparticles to trap pore-forming toxins that can damage cellular membranes and are a key factor in illnesses that result from animal bites and stings, and bacterial infections.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of California - San Diego

Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a 3D-printed device inspired by the liver to remove dangerous toxins from the blood. The device, which is designed to be used outside the body -- much like dialysis -- uses nanoparticles to trap pore-forming toxins that can damage cellular membranes and are a key factor in illnesses that result from animal bites and stings, and bacterial infections. Their findings were published May 8 in the journal Nature Communications.

Nanoparticles have already been shown to be effective at neutralizing pore-forming toxins in the blood, but if those nanoparticles cannot be effectively digested, they can accumulate in the liver creating a risk of secondary poisoning, especially among patients who are already at risk of liver failure. To solve this problem, a research team led by nanoengineering professor Shaochen Chen created a 3D-printed hydrogel matrix to house nanoparticles, forming a device that mimics the function of the liver by sensing, attracting and capturing toxins routed from the blood. The device, which is in the proof-of-concept stage, mimics the structure of the liver but has a larger surface area designed to efficiently attract and trap toxins within the device. In an in vitro study, the device completely neutralized pore-forming toxins.

"One unique feature of this device is that it turns red when the toxins are captured," said the co-first author, Xin Qu, who is a postdoctoral researcher working in Chen's laboratory. "The concept of using 3D printing to encapsulate functional nanoparticles in a biocompatible hydrogel is novel," said Chen. "This will inspire many new designs for detoxification techniques since 3D printing allows user-specific or site-specific manufacturing of highly functional products," Chen said.

Chen's lab has already demonstrated the ability to print complex 3D microstructures, such as blood vessels, in mere seconds out of soft biocompatible hydrogels that contain living cells.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California - San Diego. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Maling Gou, Xin Qu, Wei Zhu, Mingli Xiang, Jun Yang, Kang Zhang, Yuquan Wei, Shaochen Chen. Bio-inspired detoxification using 3D-printed hydrogel nanocomposites. Nature Communications, 2014; 5 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms4774

Cite This Page:

University of California - San Diego. "Bioprinting 3-D liver-like device to detoxify blood." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140508095826.htm>.
University of California - San Diego. (2014, May 15). Bioprinting 3-D liver-like device to detoxify blood. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140508095826.htm
University of California - San Diego. "Bioprinting 3-D liver-like device to detoxify blood." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140508095826.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

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