Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Sleep apnea common after acute respiratory failure

Date:
May 18, 2014
Source:
American Thoracic Society (ATS)
Summary:
Clinically important sleep apnea is common among survivors of acute respiratory failure, according to a new study. “Insomnia is a frequent complaint among survivors of critical illness,” said one researcher. “We examined a small cohort of survivors of acute respiratory failure to understand modifiable contributors to insomnia, including sleep apnea.”

Clinically important sleep apnea is common among survivors of acute respiratory failure, according to a new study presented at the 2014 American Thoracic Society International Conference.

“Insomnia is a frequent complaint among survivors of critical illness,” said Dr. Elizabeth Parsons, MD, MSc, of the Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle. “We examined a small cohort of survivors of acute respiratory failure to understand modifiable contributors to insomnia, including sleep apnea.”

The study involved 21 patients with acute respiratory failure, defined as an acute need for at least 48 hours of mechanical ventilation. Assessment included the Insomnia Severity Index and in-home level II overnight polysomnography three months after hospital discharge. Sleep-disordered breathing was assessed with the Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI) and the Respiratory Distress Index (RDI). The AHI measures the average number of apneas (breathing cessations) and hypopneas (partial obstructions) per hour. The Respiratory Distress Index (RDI) measures the average number of respiratory disturbances per hour (apneas, hypopneas, and milder events called respiratory effort–related arousals). An RDI of 15 or greater was considered clinically relevant to sleep quality and daytime function. An AHI of 15 or greater may be a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity.

Among the 14 patients who underwent polysomnography, the majority met criteria for clinically-relevant sleep apnea, with 13 having an RDI of 15 or greater and 10 having an AHI of 15 or greater. Mean RDI was 38 and mean AHI was 29. Oxygen desaturations were generally mild, with an average 3% oxygen desaturation index of 8 (number of times per hour that oxygen level drops by 3 percent or more). Insomnia severity did not significantly correlate with the presence of sleep-disordered breathing.

“The incidence and severity of sleep apnea we observed among survivors of acute respiratory failure, if replicated in larger studies, are cause for concern,” said Dr. Parsons. “Some patients had clinically significant sleep apnea despite lack of sleep complaints. Evaluating and treating sleep apnea may significantly impact the health and well-being of these patients.”

“It is important to note that trauma was the inciting event for acute respiratory failure in 57% of our tested subjects. By subject report, 29% were actively taking an opiate pain medication at the time of testing. Opiates can worsen sleep apnea by reducing upper airway tone and central respiratory drive. Our results suggest that sleep apnea is common after acute respiratory failure, with central-acting medications serving as one potential contributor.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Thoracic Society (ATS). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Thoracic Society (ATS). "Sleep apnea common after acute respiratory failure." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140518164103.htm>.
American Thoracic Society (ATS). (2014, May 18). Sleep apnea common after acute respiratory failure. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140518164103.htm
American Thoracic Society (ATS). "Sleep apnea common after acute respiratory failure." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140518164103.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) The World Health Organization has declared Nigeria free of Ebola. Health experts credit a bit of luck and the government's initial response. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Another Study Suggests Viagra Is Good For The Heart

Another Study Suggests Viagra Is Good For The Heart

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) An ingredient in erectile-dysfunction medications such as Viagra could improve heart function. Perhaps not surprising, given Viagra's history. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Worries End for Dozens on U.S. Watch Lists

Ebola Worries End for Dozens on U.S. Watch Lists

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 20, 2014) Forty-three people who had contact with Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the U.S., were cleared overnight of twice-daily monitoring after 21 days of showing no symptoms. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Calls for New Ebola Safety Guidelines

CDC Calls for New Ebola Safety Guidelines

AP (Oct. 20, 2014) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Tom Frieden laid out new guidelines for health care workers when dealing with the deadly Ebola virus including new precautions when taking off personal protective equipment. (Oct. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins