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Infant immune systems learn fast, but have short memories

Date:
June 11, 2014
Source:
Cornell University
Summary:
Forgetful immune systems leave infants particularly prone to infections, according to a new study. Upending the common theory that weak immune cells are to blame, the study has found that infants’ immune systems actually respond to infection with more speed and strength than adults, but the immunities they create fail to last.

Scanning electron micrograph of a human T lymphocyte (also called a T cell) from the immune system of a healthy donor.
Credit: NIAID

Forgetful immune systems leave infants particularly prone to infections, according to a new Cornell University study. Upending the common theory that weak immune cells are to blame, the study has found that infants' immune systems actually respond to infection with more speed and strength than adults, but the immunities they create fail to last.

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Published in the Journal of Immunology, the discovery reveals a new angle immunizations could take in protecting infants and children from infectious diseases.

"The perfect vaccine would be a single dose given at birth that generates long-lasting immunity," said immunologist Brian Rudd at Cornell's College of Veterinary Medicine, the study's lead author. "No such vaccine exists because we haven't understood why infants rapidly lose immunities. Our finding could change the way we immunize infants and ultimately lead to more effective ways of enhancing immunity in early life."

Immunity against most microbes depends on forming "memory T cells" that remember specific pathogens and can rapidly respond to future infections. Adults almost always generate large numbers of effective memory T cells during infection, around 10 percent of which stay in a long-lived memory pool to rapidly respond next time.

Rudd found that newborn T cells generated in response to infection met dramatically different fates. When faced with the same pathogen, newborn immune systems made T cells that responded more rapidly to infection than adult cells, but quickly became terminally differentiated, never making it into the memory pool.

"So the immune system is forced to start the learning process over again when infected by the same pathogen later in life." Rudd said.

"We hope to find a way to make neonatal cells behave more like adult cells in how they learn from vaccines and respond to infection. Knowledge gained from these studies could be used to design more effective therapeutic interventions and vaccines that can be safely administered in early life."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cornell University. The original article was written by Carly Hodes. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. N. L. Smith, E. Wissink, J. Wang, J. F. Pinello, M. P. Davenport, A. Grimson, B. D. Rudd. Rapid Proliferation and Differentiation Impairs the Development of Memory CD8 T Cells in Early Life. The Journal of Immunology, 2014; DOI: 10.4049/jimmunol.1400553

Cite This Page:

Cornell University. "Infant immune systems learn fast, but have short memories." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140611170748.htm>.
Cornell University. (2014, June 11). Infant immune systems learn fast, but have short memories. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140611170748.htm
Cornell University. "Infant immune systems learn fast, but have short memories." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140611170748.htm (accessed March 29, 2015).

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