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Are hormones causing children's weight gain?

Date:
June 25, 2014
Source:
Loyola University Health System
Summary:
The number of children who are obese remains alarmingly high in the U.S. and, unfortunately, diseases associated with obesity are on the rise. Worried about their overweight children, many parents wonder if other diagnoses, such as hypothyroidism, could be the reason behind their child’s weight gain. But according to experts more often than not the underlying issues are more strongly influenced by environmental factors, such as largely sedentary lifestyle or a caloric intake.

The number of children who are obese remains alarmingly high in the U.S. and, unfortunately, diseases associated with obesity are on the rise. Worried about their overweight children, many parents wonder if other diagnoses, such as hypothyroidism, could be the reason behind their child's weight gain.

But according to experts more often than not the underlying issues are more strongly influenced by environmental factors, such as largely sedentary lifestyle or a caloric intake that exceeds a child's daily needs. Other environmental influences and their genetic profile are additional topics of research and discussion.

"Parents understand that obesity is a very serious condition. They are looking for ways to help their child become healthy and often get sidetracked from the real issues. Rarely some children may have a hormonal issue. However, this constitutes less than 1 percent of all causes of childhood obesity," said Himala, Kashmiri, DO, chief of pediatric endocrinology at Loyola University Health System and assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. "More commonly, weight gain and subsequent obesity are the consequence of a child's predisposing risk of obesity and the environment."

"If a child stops their linear height or slows down in regards to height gain or is otherwise short than would be expected due to parent's height, then that certainly could and should raise concern for a hormonal imbalance that may be leading to weight gain. Weight gain alone, however, is not solely a sign of hormonal imbalance," said Kashmiri.

Other signs that a child may have a hormonal issue include:

• Drinking and urinating more than before

• Excessive hunger

• Experiencing unexplained weight loss

• Feeling of being tired and cold

• Bowl irregularities

• Changes to hair, skin or nails

• Poor linear growth or short stature

"If your child has weight gain along with these other symptoms, it's important to talk to your pediatrician about seeing a specialist," Kashmiri said. "Although severe obesity continues to rise, strategies to intervene and prevent childhood obesity actually are effective. These include decreasing sugary beverages, portion control, limiting fast food, making healthier food choices, increasing physical activity and decreasing screen time."

"Obesity can lead to numerous health issues such as diabetes, elevated cholesterol, poor self-esteem, liver disease, high blood pressure and even cancer," he said. "If your child is gaining weight talk to your pediatrician about resources and strategies to help with weight management and decreasing your child's risk for these potential consequences."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Loyola University Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Loyola University Health System. "Are hormones causing children's weight gain?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140625151246.htm>.
Loyola University Health System. (2014, June 25). Are hormones causing children's weight gain?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140625151246.htm
Loyola University Health System. "Are hormones causing children's weight gain?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140625151246.htm (accessed September 23, 2014).

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