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Denali duck-billed dino tracks discovered

Date:
July 7, 2014
Source:
Geological Society of America
Summary:
A trio of paleontologists has discovered a remarkable new tracksite in Alaska's Denali National Park filled with duck-billed dinosaur footprints -- technically referred to as hadrosaurs -- that demonstrates they not only lived in multi-generational herds but thrived in the ancient high-latitude, polar ecosystem. The article provides new insight into the herd structure and paleobiology of northern polar dinosaurs in an arctic greenhouse world.

A–C: Size ranges of tracks found at Denali National Park, Alaska, tracksite. D: Adult hadrosaurid track with skin impressions. Scale bar for C1 is 5 cm.
Credit: Fiorillo et al.

A trio of paleontologists has discovered a remarkable new tracksite in Alaska's Denali National Park filled with duck-billed dinosaur footprints -- technically referred to as hadrosaurs -- that demonstrates they not only lived in multi-generational herds but thrived in the ancient high-latitude, polar ecosystem.

The paper provides new insight into the herd structure and paleobiology of northern polar dinosaurs in an arctic greenhouse world.

The article, "Herd structure in Late Cretaceous polar dinosaurs: A remarkable new dinosaur tracksite, Denali National Park, Alaska, USA," was written for Geology by lead author Anthony R. Fiorillo, curator of earth sciences at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science, and co-authors Stephen Hasiotis of the University of Kansas and Yoshitsugu Kobayashi of the Hokkaido University Museum.

"Denali is one of the best dinosaur footprint localities in the world. What we found that last day was incredible -- so many tracks, so big and well preserved," said Fiorillo. "Many had skin impressions, so we could see what the bottom of their feet looked like. There were many invertebrate traces -- imprints of bugs, worms, larvae and more -- which were important because they showed an ecosystem existed during the warm parts of the years."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Geological Society of America. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. A. R. Fiorillo, S. T. Hasiotis, Y. Kobayashi. Herd structure in Late Cretaceous polar dinosaurs: A remarkable new dinosaur tracksite, Denali National Park, Alaska, USA. Geology, 2014; DOI: 10.1130/G35740.1

Cite This Page:

Geological Society of America. "Denali duck-billed dino tracks discovered." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 July 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140707092657.htm>.
Geological Society of America. (2014, July 7). Denali duck-billed dino tracks discovered. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140707092657.htm
Geological Society of America. "Denali duck-billed dino tracks discovered." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140707092657.htm (accessed August 30, 2014).

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