Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Certain risk factors for ACL re-injury identified

Date:
July 11, 2014
Source:
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM)
Summary:
Re-tearing a repaired knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) happens all too frequently, however a recent study suggests that identification and patient education regarding modifiable risk factors may minimize the chance of a future ACL tear.

Re-tearing a repaired knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) happens all too frequently, however a recent study being presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting suggests that identification and patient education regarding modifiable risk factors may minimize the chance of a future ACL tear.

"Our research suggests that a few risk factors such as, age, activity level and type of graft utilized may point to the possibility of re-injury," said lead author, Christopher C. Kaeding, MD of the Ohio State University. "However, with better education about adjustments that can be made, based on these risk factors, patients may be able to minimize re-tears."

Kaeding and his team analyzed data from 2,695 patients through the MOON ACL injury database from 2002-2008. All patients had a primary ACL reconstruction with no history of contralateral knee surgery. Graft type, age, Mark score, sport played after surgery, sex, smoking status, meniscal tear status and Body Mass Index (BMI) were identified as criteria for inclusion into the study.

In the results, 116/2695 (4.3%) had a graft re-tear on the same side of the body and 97/2695 (3.6%) had a re-tear on the opposite side. The odds of re-tearing the same ACL, decreased by nine percent for each year of increased age. The odds of re-tear on the opposite ACL, decreased by four percent for every year of increased age.

"The study highlights that younger age, higher activity levels at time of injury and what type of graft used (allograft) may increase risk of same side ACL injury within two years. With individuals having higher activity levels and lower age re-tears on the opposite leg were more prominent," said Kaeding. "Physicians and physical therapists need to better educate our patients about continued neuro-muscular training even after the immediate rehabilitation process has ended to help prevent future tears."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). "Certain risk factors for ACL re-injury identified." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 July 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140711091820.htm>.
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). (2014, July 11). Certain risk factors for ACL re-injury identified. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140711091820.htm
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). "Certain risk factors for ACL re-injury identified." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140711091820.htm (accessed September 22, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

AP (Sep. 21, 2014) Sierra Leone residents remained in lockdown on Saturday as part of a massive effort to confine millions of people to their homes in a bid to stem the biggest Ebola outbreak in history. (Sept. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Newsy (Sep. 20, 2014) Sierra Leone is locked down as aid workers and volunteers look for new cases of Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins