Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cancer study maps decade of discovery to potential anticancer agent

Date:
July 17, 2014
Source:
University Health Network (UHN)
Summary:
In the lab, a scientific team has used an approach combining functional RNAi analysis with gene expression analysis in breast cancer-derived cell lines and in human breast cancers replicated in mice. Using these multidimensional datasets for human breast cancer, PLK4 has been identified as a candidate target among 10,000 other targets for the development of anticancer therapeutics. "This finding led to the identification of CFI-400945, a selective and orally active inhibitor of PLK4, which was shown to have significant antitumor activity as a single agent in a variety of preclinical tumor models," says the lead researcher.

This is Dr. Tak Mak in the lab.
Credit: University Health Network

The journal Cancer Cell today published research led by Dr. Tak Mak mapping the path of discovery to developing a potential anticancer agent.

Related Articles


"What began with the question 'what makes a particular aggressive form of breast cancer cells keep growing?' turned into 10 years of systematic research to identify the enzyme PLK4 as a promising therapeutic target and develop a small molecule inhibitor to block it," says Dr. Mak, Director of The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network. He is also Professor, University of Toronto, in the Departments of Medical Biophysics and Immunology. Dr. Mak talks about his research at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vl3J_TtWYZQ.

In the lab, the scientific team used an approach that combined functional RNAi analysis with gene expression analysis in breast cancer-derived cell lines and in human breast cancers replicated in mice. Using these multidimensional datasets for human breast cancer, PLK4 was identified as a candidate target among 10,000 other targets for the development of anticancer therapeutics.

"The research showed that the aggressive form of basal breast cancer cells may be dependent on PLK4 for survival and that depleting it induced cell death," says Dr. Mak. "This finding led to the identification of CFI-400945, a selective and orally active inhibitor of PLK4, which was shown to have significant antitumor activity as a single agent in a variety of preclinical tumor models."

Another key finding was observing the inhibitor effect on tumor models with a gene PTEN deficiency as a biomarker -- of huge interest because PTEN, a tumor suppressor, is known to be defective in as many as half of all advanced solid tumor cancers.

"If clinical testing supports our hypothesis that PTEN is a predictive biomarker for CFI-40095, we will have another way to tailor personalized cancer medicine based on an individual's genetics," says Dr. Mak.

Although breast cancer was the initial focus and featured in the study published online today, the team has also conducted experiments with other types of solid tumors, with similar results. The next phase of research will involve testing in humans, which was approved last year by Health Canada and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

"It may take several more years to determine the benefit for patients," says Dr. Mak, "but we are happy to be able to provide this opportunity for our patients. We remain optimistic that we may have found a novel way to treat cancer." Dr. Mak is an internationally acclaimed immunologist renowned for his 1984 cloning of the genes encoding the human T-cell receptor.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Health Network (UHN). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Health Network (UHN). "Cancer study maps decade of discovery to potential anticancer agent." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 July 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140717124521.htm>.
University Health Network (UHN). (2014, July 17). Cancer study maps decade of discovery to potential anticancer agent. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140717124521.htm
University Health Network (UHN). "Cancer study maps decade of discovery to potential anticancer agent." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140717124521.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — A recent test of a prototype Ebola vaccine generated an immune response to the disease in subjects. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins