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Insights into birds' migration routes

Date:
July 21, 2014
Source:
Wiley
Summary:
By tracking hybrids between songbird species, investigators have found that migration routes are under genetic control and could be preventing interbreeding. The research was conducted using geolocators that, like GPS, record the position of a bird and allow its long distance movement to be tracked.
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By tracking hybrids between songbird species, investigators have found that migration routes are under genetic control and could be preventing interbreeding. The research, which is published in Ecology Letters, was conducted using geolocators that, like GPS, record the position of a bird and allow its long distance movement to be tracked.

Compared with their parents, hybrids exhibited increased variability in their migratory routes: some used intermediate routes across less suitable areas, while others used the same routes as one parental group on fall migration and the other on spring migration.

"This is the first time we've been able to track songbirds over the entire annual cycle, and the data we collected support a longstanding hypothesis in ecological speciation, that differences in migratory behavior could be acting as postmating reproductive isolating barriers," said lead author Kira Delmore.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Wiley. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kira E. Delmore, Darren E. Irwin. Hybrid songbirds employ intermediate routes in a migratory divide. Ecology Letters, 2014; DOI: 10.1111/ele.12326

Cite This Page:

Wiley. "Insights into birds' migration routes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 July 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140721123926.htm>.
Wiley. (2014, July 21). Insights into birds' migration routes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140721123926.htm
Wiley. "Insights into birds' migration routes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140721123926.htm (accessed August 27, 2015).

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