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Engineering a protein to prevent brain damage from toxic agents

Date:
July 31, 2014
Source:
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering
Summary:
New research may help prevent brain damage for those exposed to pesticides and chemical weapons. The work centers on proteins called phosphotriesterases, which are able to degrade chemicals known as organophosphates -- found in everything from industrial pesticides to sarin gas. They permanently bond to neurotransmitters in the brain, interfering with their ability to function and causing irreversible damage. The researchers re-engineered the protein to make it sufficiently stable to be used therapeutically.

Spraying pesticides on rice field. Research at New York University is paving the way for a breakthrough that may prevent brain damage in civilians and military troops exposed to poisonous chemicals -- particularly those in pesticides and chemical weapons.
Credit: ComZeal / Fotolia

Research at New York University is paving the way for a breakthrough that may prevent brain damage in civilians and military troops exposed to poisonous chemicals -- particularly those in pesticides and chemical weapons.

An article in the current issue of the journal ChemBioChem outlines the advancement in detoxifying organophosphates, which are compounds commonly used in pesticides and warfare agents. The patent-pending process was developed by NYU School of Engineering Associate Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering Jin Kim Montclare, along with Richard Bonneau, an associate professor in NYU's Department of Biology and a member of the computer science faculty at NYU's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

Their work centers on proteins called phosphotriesterases, which have the unique capability of degrading chemicals in a class known as organophosphates, which are found in everything from industrial pesticides to the sarin gas used in chemical warfare. Organophosphates permanently bond to neurotransmitters in the brain, interfering with their ability to function and causing irreversible damage. The ability of phosphotriesterases to detoxify organophosphates has been previously documented; however, applications using the protein for this purpose have been limited by its short half-life and instability at high temperatures.

Montclare and her colleagues devised a method of re-engineering phosphotriesterases by incorporating an artificial fluorinated amino acid and computational biology. The result: a thermo-stable protein with a longer half-life that retains all the detoxification capabilities of the original version.

"Organophosphates pose tremendous danger to people and wildlife, and sadly it's not unusual for humans to come into contact with these compounds, whether through exposure to pesticide or an intentional chemical warfare attack," explained Montclare. "We've known that phosphotriesterases had the power to detoxify these nerve agents, but they were far too fragile to be used therapeutically," she said.

In a process that married computational biology and experimentation, the collaborators used Rosetta computational modeling software to identify sequences in the fluorinated phosphotriesterase protein that could be modified to increase its stability and make therapeutic applications a reality.

The possibilities for this reengineered protein are considerable. Montclare explained that in addition to therapeutic formulations, which could prevent nerve damage in the event of a gas attack or pesticide exposure and would likely be developed first for military use, the proteins could be critical when stores of toxic nerve agents need to be decommissioned.

"Oftentimes, chemical agent stockpiles are decommissioned through processes that involve treatment with heat and caustic chemical reagents for neutralization, followed by hazardous materials disposal," she said. "These proteins could accomplish that same task enzymatically, without the need for reactors and formation of dangerous byproducts."

Plans are under way to begin developing therapeutic applications for this modified phosphotriesterase, and the research team believes that its methodology -- using computational biology to identify potentially beneficial modifications to proteins -- could point the way to future breakthroughs in engineered proteins.

The initial idea for this work was broached by Michelle Zhang, a co-author of the paper and, at the time, a high school intern in Bonneau's lab. Zhang is now a student at Cornell University. Other collaborators include NYU School of Engineering doctoral students Andrew J. Olsen, Ching-Yao Yang, and Carlo Yuvienco; and P. Douglas Renfrew, a postdoctoral scholar in the Bonneau Laboratory at NYU.

Research was supported by a grant from the U.S. Army Research Office and the National Science Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ching-Yao Yang, P. Douglas Renfrew, Andrew J. Olsen, Michelle Zhang, Carlo Yuvienco, Richard Bonneau, Jin Kim Montclare. Improved Stability and Half-Life of Fluorinated Phosphotriesterase Using Rosetta. ChemBioChem, 2014; DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201402062

Cite This Page:

New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering. "Engineering a protein to prevent brain damage from toxic agents." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 July 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140731095134.htm>.
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering. (2014, July 31). Engineering a protein to prevent brain damage from toxic agents. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140731095134.htm
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering. "Engineering a protein to prevent brain damage from toxic agents." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140731095134.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

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