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Insights on whale shark populations and evidence for their historic rise, recent decline

Date:
August 4, 2014
Source:
Wiley
Summary:
In the largest study on the genetics of whale sharks conducted to date, researchers found that the world's biggest fish likely exist in 2 distinct populations with minimal connectivity between the Indo-Pacific and the Atlantic Ocean. The findings suggest that mixing of whale sharks between the Indian and Atlantic was and is rare.
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Whale shark.
Credit: Image courtesy of Simon Pierce

In the largest study on the genetics of whale sharks conducted to date, researchers found that the world's biggest fish likely exist in 2 distinct populations with minimal connectivity between the Indo-Pacific and the Atlantic Ocean. The findings suggest that mixing of whale sharks between the Indian and Atlantic was and is rare.

The Molecular Ecology investigators also found a significant and likely recent population expansion, but a very recent bottleneck might have gone undetected as genetic diversity at Ningaloo Reef in Australia has declined during 5 consecutive recent years.

In the future, genetic analyses can greatly increase researchers' still very limited understanding of whale shark ecology and the status of what appears for now to be at least 2 populations.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Wiley. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Thomas M. Vignaud, Jeffrey A. Maynard, Raphael Leblois, Mark G. Meekan, Ricardo Vázquez-Juárez, Dení Ramírez-Macías, Simon J. Pierce, David Rowat, Michael L. Berumen, Champak Beeravolu, Sandra Baksay, Serge Planes. Genetic structure of populations of whale sharks among ocean basins and evidence for their historic rise and recent decline. Molecular Ecology, 2014; 23 (10): 2590 DOI: 10.1111/mec.12754

Cite This Page:

Wiley. "Insights on whale shark populations and evidence for their historic rise, recent decline." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140804123307.htm>.
Wiley. (2014, August 4). Insights on whale shark populations and evidence for their historic rise, recent decline. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140804123307.htm
Wiley. "Insights on whale shark populations and evidence for their historic rise, recent decline." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140804123307.htm (accessed August 30, 2015).

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