Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Low-cost drug may lessen blood loss in hip, knee surgery

Date:
August 21, 2014
Source:
Mount Sinai Medical Center
Summary:
Treatment with an inexpensive, decades-old clotting drug reduces the need for blood transfusions, research shows. While commonly used in patients with bleeding disorders or heavy menstrual bleeding, the clotting drug tranexamic acid is now increasingly used to prevent excessive blood loss during hip and knee replacement surgery, a million of which are now performed each year in the United States.

Treatment with an inexpensive, decades-old clotting drug reduces the need for blood transfusions during and after hip and knee replacement surgeries without increasing the risk of complications, according to a study by researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Hospital for Special Surgery published online in the British Medical Journal.

Related Articles


While commonly used in patients with bleeding disorders or heavy menstrual bleeding, the clotting drug tranexamic acid is now increasingly used to prevent excessive blood loss during hip and knee replacement surgery, a million of which are now performed each year in the United States. While there are benefits to this drug, there are also safety concerns as it prevents enzymes in the body from breaking down blood clots that could potentially cause complications such as thrombosis.

"Our study, an analysis of past data, found that the use of tranexamic acid in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement surgery was associated with an up to 70 percent decrease in the need for a blood transfusion, and without an increased risk of complications related to clotting." said Jashvant Poeran, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Institute of Healthcare Delivery Science, Department of Population Science, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and lead author of the newly published study. "An increasing number of patients will require these surgeries as America ages, and maintaining their safety is very important."

Using data from a national database, the researchers analyzed 872,416 total hip or knee replacement procedures at 510 US hospitals between 2006 and 2012. After adjusting for factors such as patient age, sex, hospital size and location, type of procedure and anesthesia used, patients given tranexamic acid (1000 mg, 2000 mg, or 3000 mg) on the day of surgery were compared with patients not given the drug.

The research team also found use of tranexamic acid to be associated with lower rates of admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), lower length of hospital stay, and lower costs of hospital stay. A dose of 2000 mg of tranexamic acid appeared to have the best effectiveness and safety profile.

"While there are some limitations to our study, the results appear to support the current practice of increasing use of this drug in hip and knee surgery," said Dr. Poeran. "Identifying patients most likely to benefit -- that is those at increased risk of bleeding and for requiring blood transfusions -- is crucial. Additional studies are needed to confirm this benefit, including those that focus on optimal dosing."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mount Sinai Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. J. Poeran, R. Rasul, S. Suzuki, T. Danninger, M. Mazumdar, M. Opperer, F. Boettner, S. G. Memtsoudis. Tranexamic acid use and postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty in the United States: retrospective analysis of effectiveness and safety. BMJ, 2014; 349 (aug12 8): g4829 DOI: 10.1136/bmj.g4829

Cite This Page:

Mount Sinai Medical Center. "Low-cost drug may lessen blood loss in hip, knee surgery." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140821153516.htm>.
Mount Sinai Medical Center. (2014, August 21). Low-cost drug may lessen blood loss in hip, knee surgery. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140821153516.htm
Mount Sinai Medical Center. "Low-cost drug may lessen blood loss in hip, knee surgery." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140821153516.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The MelaFind device is a pain-free way to check suspicious moles for melanoma, without the need for a biopsy. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Battling Multiple Myeloma

Battling Multiple Myeloma

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The answer isn’t always found in new drugs – repurposing an ‘old’ drug that could mean better multiple myeloma treatment, and hope. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) New information that is linking chronic inflammation in the prostate and prostate cancer, which may help doctors and patients prevent cancer in the future. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) Blood transfusions are proving crucial to young sickle cell patients by helping prevent strokes, even when there is no outward sign of brain injury. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins